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window tinting

Posted By:
Paul Fusillo
3
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 8/19/2009 20:31:51

I woulkd like to apply window tinting to my airplane.( Acrylic)  I am having trouble finding a material that will work. Tap plastic has film but they say the surface cannot be curved. Others say the adhesive will ruin the acrylic.. Any suggestions??



Dana Heimos
60
Posts
33
#2 Posted: 8/20/2009 08:40:02 Modified: 8/20/2009 08:46:30

Normal adhesive tint (the type you see on automobiles) does not work well on acrylic. You will get bubbles and the heat needed to apply it would likely leave cracks down the road. Your best bet would be static cling tint. Here is a Beech 95 B-55 that tried this approach.

I have 20% tint on my car and I find it to be the perfect balance between darkness and visibility. In an aircraft you may want to use 20% on the back window and 35% on the front. That's just my opinion.




James Scott
Homebuilder or Craftsman
5
Posts
1
#3 Posted: 8/20/2009 10:06:12

My last two airplanes, both Cessna's, had good windows one tinted and the other clear. After flying both for a couple hundred hours I prefer clear. The tinted window was seemed to be restrictive at dusk and on hazy days and made it harder to see traffic. I fly out of a very busy non tower airport and traffic is hard enough to spot under ideal conditions. I also take a lot of pictures and the clear windows work best with my equipment.

Good sunglasses help with the clear. I would also worry about distortion and depth perception with a product that is added on to an aircraft window.



Paul Fusillo
3
Posts
0
#4 Posted: 8/20/2009 11:21:32

Thanks for the info, I will use it only on the back windows



Barry Elk
Homebuilder or Craftsman
60
Posts
33
#5 Posted: 8/20/2009 23:29:26

I've got 2000+ hours in bubble canopy fighters.  No tint and I routinely flew with a yellow visor.  (Cut the haze and and sharpened things but no reduction in light to speak of).

 

If you want "early tally" on the other plane - then no tint is the way to go.

 

That being said, if I was on an IFR cross-country, I always wore sunglasses under my helmet and I might have been seen clipping, wedging, or otherwise using an enroute chart as a sunshield.

 

No way I would ever want a permanent degradation to my vision on a canopy, windshield or window.   Leave that to the fools with large bass speakers in their cars . . .



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