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Transatlantic Trips to Europe

Posted By:
Matthew Gjedde
69
Posts
19
#1 Posted: 9/16/2009 06:23:48

I have been looking at routes for flying small aircraft transatlantic to Europe. I was thinking the Cessna 182 or Mooney Bravo being used as equipment. The truth of the matter is I am considering a flight simulator trip, but wanted it to be as realistic as possible. The routes I was looking at are the semi-standard northern route and southern route. The northern route takes you up through Maine, into Canada (St John's, Gander, or Goose Bay), across to Greenland (Narsarsuaq), over to Iceland, and down in to Irelend, England, Scotland, or Wales. The southern route is probably too long a trip for the 182 or Bravo, and involves leaving the North Carolina coast, flying to Bermuda, then a long hop to Santa Maria in the Azores, then across to Portugal or Spain. I was wondering if anyone on here had ever made a transatlantic trip in a small aircraft, and if they had any information about how to make this virtual trip more realistic.

I did see the thread about international flying in experimental category aircraft. Because my request was somewhat different from anything in that thread, I posted a new one.

Thank you for any information.



Green Dot, Runway 27, July 25, 2009 Follow Me at twitter.com/mdgjedde
Duncan Maxwell
Homebuilder or Craftsman
2
Posts
1
#2 Posted: 9/16/2009 08:05:21

That's the neat thing about Flight Simulator, it allows you to do things that you aren't always able to in real life. I left Sydney well over a year ago in FS and have slowly plodded around the world in real time when I got time which being the father of two young twins doesn't amount to much. I literally arrived in KOSH only a week ago. I flew across from Europe using the northern Route you first described although I have to admit that I did it in the 737-800, but I landed at UK, Iceland, Greenland, Canada as if I was flying something with shorter legs. Also I only have the patience to sit behind the computer for about 3 hours max and will try and keep the legs no longer then an hour and a half although often on overseas flight you don't get that choice.



Alice Cornwell
65
Posts
29
#3 Posted: 9/16/2009 08:13:59

Can you install ferry tanks in Flight Simulator?



Matthew Gjedde
69
Posts
19
#4 Posted: 9/16/2009 11:37:04
Alice Cornwell wrote:

 

Can you install ferry tanks in Flight Simulator?

 

No, but there is an "unlimited fuel" option, or you can change the fuel level on the fly.



Green Dot, Runway 27, July 25, 2009 Follow Me at twitter.com/mdgjedde
Scott Ekberg
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
1
Post
0
#5 Posted: 9/17/2009 19:19:33

Matthew...A personal friend of mine has had at least 2 around-the -world flights, one just recently ended with success in Dec 08. Her name is CarolAnn Garratt...ever heard of her?  Anyway...I'm sure she'd be receptive to any questions you may have for her. She also wrote 2 books about her 2 trips...On Silver Wings and On Silver Wings II.  Both flights were for the benefit of ALS (Lou Gerigs Disease). Any books you buy from her..100% of the proceeds go to the research...she does not even take expense money.  Anyway, you can contact her  at  ca.garratt@att.net.  Enjoy your adventure and plan...plan...plan...and then plan some more.



Matthew Gjedde
69
Posts
19
#6 Posted: 9/19/2009 12:11:09
Scott Ekberg wrote:

 

Matthew...A personal friend of mine has had at least 2 around-the -world flights, one just recently ended with success in Dec 08. Her name is CarolAnn Garratt...ever heard of her?  Anyway...I'm sure she'd be receptive to any questions you may have for her. She also wrote 2 books about her 2 trips...On Silver Wings and On Silver Wings II.  Both flights were for the benefit of ALS (Lou Gerigs Disease). Any books you buy from her..100% of the proceeds go to the research...she does not even take expense money.  Anyway, you can contact her  at  ca.garratt@att.net.  Enjoy your adventure and plan...plan...plan...and then plan some more.

 

Thanks for the advice. This sounds interesting enough to where I might want to make the flight in real life sometime in the (distant) future. For now, though, Flight Simulator will have to do. I'll probably save this odyssey until the home computer is replaced from a 2003 XP machine to shiny new Windows 7 machine sometime soon. Then I'll get the "new" version of Flight Simulator, FSX.



Green Dot, Runway 27, July 25, 2009 Follow Me at twitter.com/mdgjedde
Wim De Saar
1
Post
0
#7 Posted: 9/21/2009 14:43:27

Hi Scott ;

 

there is a very good book on just that topic ; "Ocean Flying" by Luise Sacchi. She used to ferry GA airplanes (twins and singles) across both the Atlantic and the Pacific. Good reading with lots of advice on the possible routes etc.

 

Good luck!!

 

Woody



Jay Parker
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
0
#8 Posted: 9/28/2009 06:54:14

I've had the same idea about flying to Europe using a Zenith CH-801 with extended range fuel wing tanks.  I just need to figure out how to change the code in my flight sim to accomodate 60 gallons of fuel instead of 30.  Actually, it has been done a lot of people and there is a website that tells you what and how to do it.  It has things I never even thought of, of things you need to bring to make a trip across frozen atlantic waters not to mention the different flight authorities you will need to communicate with in each country.  Here's a website that tells you what you need to do in real life to fly to Europe: http://xpda.com/flyingtoeurope/  . I have tried it in my FSX flight sim (with just 30 gallon tanks) but had ditched off shore (and swimming distance if I wasn't killed in the splash down), within site of the runway at Reykjavik, Iceland from Kulusuk, Greenland.  Bummer.  I had some headwinds and nastier than expected weather.  And I had that thing leaned the best I could get it too.  If I had had the extended range fuel tanks it wouldn't have been a problem.  The best way to find your route is to use Google Earth and their distance measuing tool from one airport to another and make a preliminary plot of your stops. I think in real life even with the 60 gallon extended range fuel tanks that can be bought for the Ch-801 kitplane, I'd like to have one more source of one or two hours of fuel either in a belly pod or adding yet another two more smaller wing tanks.  Maybe if I ever get my Kitplane started and built we can fly it together (grins).

Jay Parker



Gregory Lawrence
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
31
Posts
12
#9 Posted: 10/1/2009 05:51:47

In 1966 I was a  "Line Boy" at Reliable Aviation in Dayton Ohio.  Louise Sacchi would stop for fuel ferrying something from Wichita.  I was the only person allowed to touch her aircraft.  I was in High School and started work at 4:00 PM.  If she got there at 13:00 she would wait until I arrived to fuel her aircraft.  I was the only Private Pilot working on the line and had the greatest appreciation of fuel management but I don't think that is why she chose me.  I learned so much from her.  She carefully timed different power settings on different tanks.  So it was important for her to know exactly how much fuel was put into each tank.  She checked her calculations then between Dayton and Gander.  She used her calculations between Gander and Edinburgh.

There is a spirit of aviation.  The spiritual being having the human experience known as Greg and the spiritual being having the human experience known as Louise are both very much part of that aviation spirit and they connected.  To the other line boys, she was a mean old lady.  She was usually flying something registered in Saudi Arabia or something like that with all letters for its call sign.  She called herself Sacchi One so that it didn't take 5 minutes to say her call sign.  Frequently a controller would argue with her about not being an airline.  She always won the argument and continued to be Sacchi One.  Thank you Woody for reminding me of this.



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