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Posted By:
Michael Cook
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
26
Posts
3
#1 Posted: 6/8/2010 22:19:29

Hello My name is Michael Cook and Im currently deployed right now. I'm from Fairbanks, Alaska and I have a pilots Liencse. I just started this blog about flying, and need your help! I need people who have flown to alaska in the past year to write me so I my put it on my blog. So that way I can put something together and help other pilots going to alaska to better there flight. If you have a story you would like to tell. Please email me. or reply to this post..

 

 

Thanks for your help and Time. And i'll keep doing what I do over here.......

 

Michael Cook



Anyone can fly but it takes a Pilot to land!
Jerry Rosie
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
482
Posts
101
#2 Posted: 6/9/2010 08:05:42

Never been to Alaska, and will probably never get there - but - thanks for your service.

LTC (Ret)



Cheers, Jerry NC22375 out of 07N
Kelly McMullen
Homebuilder or Craftsman
4
Posts
0
#3 Posted: 6/10/2010 19:59:25

I can't help you with recent information. I did learn to fly at Ft. Wainwright while spending most of my service time there in the early to mid-70s. After my active duty, I worked as a controller at the Fairbanks Tracon for 5+ years.  Last flew south along the Alaska Highway in 1992. I don't expect a lot has changed as far as the airports are concerned. Whitehorse is top notch, with motel rooms above the FBO hangar. Most of the route still has colored airways, so ADF is useful for lower MEAs and more hospitable terrain than the Victor airways. Of course if weather permits flying the route VFR along the highway is top notch.



David Hanna
Vintage Aircraft Association Member
1
Post
0
#4 Posted: 6/11/2010 00:48:58

Thank you for serving.

I flew my Cessna 205 VFR to and around Alaska in Aug and Sept 2009. I flew gps direct non-stop from eastern Washington State W01 to Ketchikan, no customs, just filed the flight plan with the US side. I spent 3 days in Ketchikan waiting for a break in the weather, stayed at a hostel for $28.25 a night. Flew to Haines and Skagway, stayed at a hostel in Skagway for $20.00 a night. Camped at the awesome airplanes only campground at Fairbanks, great spot with hot showers and loaner bicycles for only $10.00 dollars a night. Tamarack Air at the other end of the airport was great, they (she) had all the charts we needed and even lent us a car to go visit the museum in Fairbanks. Camped at Coldfoot airport, walked to the truckstop on the haul road and checked out the visitors center just off the highway. No fuel at the time at Coldfoot and poor weather to the north so we sidestepped over to Bettles and camped there, got fuel (expensive) and ate at the lodge there, nice folks. Slightly better weather and we flew to Anaktuvuk Pass in the Brooks Range, not much there, friendly folks. Then on to Deadhorse, only stopped long enough to get fuel and weather report, then on to Barrow.

Barrow was IFR with 30 mile visibility and a 500 foot ceiling. I transmitted my location and intentions on the CTAF, Barrow Flight Service came on frequency and said that Barrow was IFR and asked my intentions. I realized that since Barrow has a flight service station and no control tower that the flight service station becomes the controlling agency when the field goes IFR, that means that VFR pilots must request a Special VFR arrival, this was granted of course, but they can't offer it, the pilot has to REQUEST Special VFR. Spent 2 great days in Barrow, very friendly folks, locals took us 11 miles down the beach on 4 wheelers to see the Wiley Post/Will Rogers memorial at the site where those two crashed and died on their around the world flight. Kotzebue was beautiful and sunny one day and raining the next, then back to Fairbanks. Leaving Alaska several days later I cleared customs at Whitehorse without problem, although filing the eAPIS was a bit of a pain. Whitehorse, Mckenzie, 108 Mile and the uphill strip at 100 Mile to visit family, then filed back to W01 with the instruction to pick up a transponder code when I flew by Kamloops.

My transponder failed and would not transmit the code, the Canadians didn't have a solution other than to land in Canada. On the ground the US FAA folks said that I needed to get up high enough to contact Seattle Center, then they could consider the transponder an inflight equipment failure and give me a no transponder clearance to cross into the US. If I had known this I could have done that first without landing short of the border to sort it out. Not often a transponder fails when trying to cross the border, but now I know how to handle it.

Canada has slightly different VFR rules, no VFR above 12,000 unless terrain requires it, no VFR on top with an instrument rating.

Hopes some of this is helpful.

Thanks again, David Hanna



Michael Cook
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
26
Posts
3
#5 Posted: 6/11/2010 18:44:59

Thank you for responding to my post as I would love to use this in my blog and Website. But one thing stands out and very personal to me in this story. See you talked about Tamarack Air. And that's funny Because I worked there, And I know Vickey really well. She trained me to fly, took me to aviation conventions. And She too was the reason why I started in EAA. She bought my very first EAA Membership. Im going to talk about Tamarack Air as my first actical. I use to sell parts and charts there. It's a great place to make your stop if flying into fairbanks.....

 

Thanks again for the story and you can visit my blog at http://mylifeflying.wordpress.com

 

Thanks Michael Cook



Anyone can fly but it takes a Pilot to land!
Joe LaMantia
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
175
Posts
69
#6 Posted: 6/12/2010 10:53:50

I spent 3 weeks in SE Alaska in May of 1997.  Flew commercial to Juneau, then used various ferry shuttles.  We did 3 different B&B's, GREAT people beautiful state.  Spent several days in Gustavus, about 500 people near Glacier Bay...took that tour. Lots of wildlife great hiking and an old DC3 crashed in the woods there back in the 1950's.  The wreck is still there, lot's of parts laying around, very interesting.  They have a 10,000 foot runway built during WWII, mostly Cessna's based there.  Spent a week in Sitka, took Alaskan Ferry from Juneau a 12 hr trip mostly on the inside passage.  Best way to get there if your not in a hurry.  You can see all the wildlife, whales and such at a fraction of the cruise ship cost and meet lots of locals plus you get some colorful stops along the way...like Hoona.

Can't say enough about the hospitality, we were taken out to dinner by our B&B hosts in Stika, they introduced us to another couple who lent us their spare car for a weekend!

Terrific sea food, I especially like the Halibit.  Our next trip up there will be to Fairbanks, my wife lived there for a couple of years, her Dad was career Air Force and based at Ladd AFB back in the 50's.  They drove the Alaskan highway all the way down to the lower 48 when his assignment transferred him to Texas, she's still talking about that trip!

Joe