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Aerial photography, hobby style

Posted By:
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#1 Posted: 9/8/2010 21:11:24


P1010963.JPGAs a former recon pilot in Army Intelligence, and after 30+ years of teaching air photo interpretation at Oregon State University, I have enjoyed many years of taking aerial photos for both research and simply as a hobby.  Anyone interested in an aerial photography group?

Chuck Rosenfeld, Chapter 617, Oregon

 



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Martin Travers
14
Posts
15
#2 Posted: 9/9/2010 04:34:50

What a stunning image!
I think an aerial photography group would be a great idea although, as a non-pilot, I am not sure I would be able to contribute very much.
However, I do take to the air whenever the opportunity presents itself, and think that the world beneath our wings offers a wonderful source of potentially inspiring photographic images.
In that connection, here is one of my favourite aerial photographs : Mount Aspiring in New Zealand’s southern Alps viewed from the jump seat of P-51D ‘’Dove of Peace’’ operated by Robert Broek out of Wanaka.
Martin Travers (UK)



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Ron Wanttaja
246
Posts
98
#3 Posted: 9/9/2010 09:25:19

Taken from my Fly Baby in May 2008.  Nikon Coolpix 4000.


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Ron Wanttaja
Jon Wanzer
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America MemberHomebuilder or Craftsman
90
Posts
10
#4 Posted: 9/9/2010 11:34:53

Greetings Chuck,

It sounds like a fantastic idea to me. What did you have in mind?

~Jon



FlyBoyJon ✈ Aviator, builder, and tool junkie ✈ jon@FlyBoyJon.comwww.FlyBoyJon.com
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#5 Posted: 9/9/2010 21:16:51

You have spectacular results... especially since you took this photo through plexiglas!  The thrill of a P-51 ride is an added bonus.

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#6 Posted: 9/9/2010 21:21:05

Great shot!  We are both benetiffing from 'open cockpit' photography... no reflections!

I use a Lumix DMC-50, and recently a Lumix ZS7 with GPS (nice to know your exact location while shooting).

Thanks!

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#7 Posted: 9/9/2010 21:23:43

Jon,

 

I just thought this forum would enable photo enthusiasts to share air photos, techniques, camera preferences, etc;

Who knows what may develop?

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Martin Travers
14
Posts
15
#8 Posted: 9/13/2010 18:40:11

 I am surprised. I really thought more people would be interested in the subject of aerial, as opposed to simply aeronautical, photography.
Oh well … each to his own so, for what they are worth, here are another two of my recent aerial pics … the Swiss Alps ‘up close and personal’ as viewed from a Ju52.


Ju-52 11 Sept 2009 070.jpg

 

Ju-52 11 Sept 2009 099.jpg



Andy Gamache
Homebuilder or Craftsman
122
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#9 Posted: 9/14/2010 02:02:03


I like to take shots out the window as well. Here's a few of my favorites from Afghanistan....

 


Afghan Dust Storm.jpg

That line the storm is getting ready to cross is a major roadway.



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These lakes are now a national park.



Matthew Kuhns
7
Posts
2
#10 Posted: 9/14/2010 12:02:30

I'd be interested in joining, would love to learn more about aerial photography.



Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#11 Posted: 9/14/2010 16:47:09

As a retired geosciences professor (and longtime glaciology instructor with field camps in Alaska) your Southern Alps and European Alps pictures are intrigiung..... but so are the unusual camera platforms that you have used!

 

Thanks for the photos.... what type of camera do us use?

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#12 Posted: 9/14/2010 16:49:25

Great Photos... from your photo icon it looks like your shooting from inside a cockpit... any hints about how to reduce glare and reflections?

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#13 Posted: 9/14/2010 16:52:36

Matthew,   just keep checking this thread... I hope to fill it with interesting photos and get photography tips from other readers-  I really likes your "sunset nacelle" photo!

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Martin Travers
14
Posts
15
#14 Posted: 9/14/2010 17:32:27

 Hi Chuck.
Thanks for your kind comments on my pics.
Re camera equipment; I use either a Nikon D80 with an 18-135mm lens if there is plenty of room to manipulate it, otherwise an old pocket sized Pentax Optio S5i compact.
To keep canopy/window glare to a minimum, I try to hold the lens as close to the plexiglass as possible, but not actually touching in order to avoid vibration.
Re the 'interesting platforms'; as a non-pilot with a love of warbirds, I have to make use of whatever plane I can buy or beg a ride in.

Rgds - Martin



Chris Durand
Homebuilder or Craftsman
15
Posts
4
#15 Posted: 9/14/2010 20:02:51

I love the idea, I am new to photography and could really benefit from a group like this.

-Chris



Please follow my progress of the MkV all metal biplane. www.mkvbiplane.com
Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#16 Posted: 9/14/2010 21:34:44


P1010959.JPG Let's talk a little bit about the essentials of hand

 held aerial photos...  Most folks are using digital camers these days.  Completely automatic cameras are almost useless because even at lower altitudes the sky scatters UV radiation which usually 'over exposes' the image in the camera- but UV light doesn't register on normal exposure metering devices in the camera!  At a minimum the camera must have a "white balance" or "exposure control" feature.  This is especially important if you take photos of scenes that show the horizon (known as a high angle oblique).  Photos directed at a ground object that does not show the sky are known as low angle obliques, and suffer less from UV backscatter.  Usually an exposure of one to three "f-stops" below normal exposure settings is ideal for aerial photography.

An additional feature one would desire is the ability to choose a 'shutter speed'....  while digital cameras rarely have an actual shutter like a film camera, they can limit the time used to acquire the image.  Ideally, a 'shutter speed' of less than 1/800th of a second will usually eliminate any motion blur in the photo.

NEXT TOPIC:   Mega pixels and focal lengths!

 



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Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Martin Travers
14
Posts
15
#17 Posted: 9/15/2010 15:18:08

Excellent Chuck, thanks, and some more great photos too.

It is worth remembering of course that, with digital photography, it is at least fairly easy to adjust any over exposure after downloading the pics to your computer.

I may as well take the opportunity of including another of my aerial photos, taken a little closer to home  ... an English hamlet in Cambridgeshire taken from a Tiger Moth using my Pentax compact camera.



Tiger Moth 23 Sept 2009 038.jpg



Andy Gamache
Homebuilder or Craftsman
122
Posts
28
#18 Posted: 9/16/2010 09:38:58

The owner of this house needs to get a hobby other than golf...

 


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Chuck Rosenfeld
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#19 Posted: 9/16/2010 12:06:58

Andy,  I agree with your golf comment!  Your pictures illustrate a good photography point, from an aerial perspective, a cross-lit image has the illusion of greater depth and definition.  A quatering backlit photo, like your first one, is probably the best at giving depth to vertical objects like buildings.  Objects imaged with direct lighting (sun behind the aircraft) look 'flat' or often have low contrast.

 

Chuck



Chuck Rosenfeld Major General (Ret) US Army
Hew Mills
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
1
Post
0
#20 Posted: 9/16/2010 19:11:50

Thanks Charles for some great advice. I am really just a happy snapper who has spent many years looking down. My principle is that aerial photography is as much about having the equipment in the right place at the right time. Though I'd love to have a large sensor camera (notice I didn't say large megapixel!), I make do with pocket cameras as you can always have on in the cockpit with you - and that's the firs step in taking aerial pictures! (I use a LUMIX DMC-TZ10). As a pilot that also takes pictures the camera has to be quick to get ready and easy to handle with one hand in the confines of the cockpit so I'm stuck with a small camera.

This photo is taken with a low afternoon light illuminating rain falling 7,000 feet and causing an inverted rainbow over Western Queensland. 




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