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Designers: Where are the LSA Aerobatic Planes?

Posted By:
Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#1 Posted: 9/17/2010 11:55:16

When is someone going to design something similar to the DR107, SuperFli, etc with a bigger, thicker wing so it will meet the light sport rule even with a O-320?



Joanne Palmer
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
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68
#2 Posted: 9/17/2010 15:31:14

I think the rules for LSA preclude aerobatics. 



Ron Wanttaja
246
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98
#3 Posted: 9/18/2010 10:26:19
Joanne Palmer wrote:

 

I think the rules for LSA preclude aerobatics. 

Looks that way.  I scanned through the ASTM standard, and only a single value for load limits is given.  Didn't see any sections on aerobatics.

If the operating limitations for the SLSA includes a prohibition on aerobatics, the FAA may well include it in the limitations if you decide to put the plane in Experimental LSA category.

 



Ron Wanttaja
Joanne Palmer
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
276
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#4 Posted: 9/18/2010 23:51:58
Ron Wanttaja wrote:

 

Joanne Palmer wrote:

 

I think the rules for LSA preclude aerobatics. 

Looks that way.  I scanned through the ASTM standard, and only a single value for load limits is given.  Didn't see any sections on aerobatics.

If the operating limitations for the SLSA includes a prohibition on aerobatics, the FAA may well include it in the limitations if you decide to put the plane in Experimental LSA category.

 

 

Not to mention the engines, speed limits and airfoils used tend not to perform well in aerobatics. 



John Maxfield
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
38
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7
#5 Posted: 9/19/2010 09:56:18

It sounds like the original post here is seeking unlimited aerobatic performance in an LSA. Obviously, thats not the same as Basic or Sportsman category IAC competition aerobatics.  After years of chasing performance to fly in the upper IAC competition categories, I've found less stress, less expense, and more enjoyment flying in Sportsman category.

It's my understanding that LSA rules do not PROHIBIT aerobatics.  LSA rules makes it challenging to extract aerobatic performance from an LSA design.   Both lower categories can be flown with a Sonex Sport Acro.  For me, Sonex is the best designed, constructed, and supported, out of the box, kit aerobatic, LSA on the market.

Happy Landings

John

 



Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#6 Posted: 9/19/2010 12:08:09

Aerobatics are NOT restricted under the light sport rule.  You can compete in IAC competitions with a light sport.  I'm not looking for unlimited performance in a light sport plane.  That's not going to happen.  I'm just looking for something other than the clipped Cubs and T-Carts.  If you put a big enough wing on something like a DR-107, you can bring the stall down to 51 mph or less and give the wing enough drag to keep the top speed below 138 mph.  An O-320 will give good climb performance.  I'm looking for something with classic looks and the Sonex is just not there.  Maybe if I could put an RV-3 cowling on a Sonex Onex?



Joanne Palmer
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
276
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68
#7 Posted: 9/20/2010 12:25:55

By "preclude" I wasin't implying that they were PROHIBITED.  More that the performance limitations imposed do not allow for easy aerobatic maneuvering.  It would be like trying to do all the Commercial Pilot PTS maneuvers in a Cub.   It probably can be done but nowhere near as easy as in a 182. 



Rick Pellicciotti
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
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#8 Posted: 9/27/2010 12:41:05

You just need to hold tight for a little while longer.  This airplane should be here next year:

 

The Dallair FR-01 

I am very excited about it.  They also have a Facebook page.

 

There are no restrictions on sport pilots flying aerobatics or airplanes that meet the definition of a Light Sport Aircraft flying aerobatics.  Obviously, a manufacturer could placard the airplane against aerobatics if he chooses to do so.



Rick Pellicciotti, Falco N63KC http://www.prowlerjaguar.com
DJ Laur
2
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0
#9 Posted: 9/27/2010 20:24:28

There are a few planes I can think of that fit the bill and remain in the realm of "affordable". As mentioned, Sonex/Onex is one of them, but I agree they don't have the classic look. I kinda like the look but that's just me. There are a couple biplanes, EAA biplane, Smith miniplane, Parakeet... Also, the Rans S-9 is specifically made for the mission. I have not gone through and verified all the numbers on each of these aircraft to confirm LSA qualification so don't call me out, but they are out there.



Marl Halbrook
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
7
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#10 Posted: 10/1/2010 12:34:38

The Stolp Starduster I fits the bill, the Starlet, also.  The Rans S-9 and S-10 hit the nail square on the head!  Just bought an S-9 for the express purpose of having an aerobatic plane that can be flown by a Sport Pilot.



Marl Halbrook, EAA TC/FA Albany GA Starduster Too BK-1 Beta
Rick Pellicciotti
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
25
Posts
8
#11 Posted: 5/26/2011 13:13:01

Here's two videos of the prototype Dallair FR-01 flying:

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/rpellicciotti?feature=mhee#p/c/80A1B0C31A1931D6/0/Z2c85_hQOZU



Rick Pellicciotti, Falco N63KC http://www.prowlerjaguar.com