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stom warning for Oshkosh

Posted By:
Kevin O'halloran
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America Member
30
Posts
3
#1 Posted: 4/1/2011 20:23:51

Many of my friends at Sun n fun said they had no warning of the approaching storm at Lakeland.

With all the campers at Oshkosh--I feel it would be money well spent to have some type of warning system if a bad storm was coming--the last place you want to be in the middle of the night,is in a tent ,in a sea of small aircraft.

You can ride out heavy rain and even small hail in a tent---but 100 MPH winds are a different story.

could be something as simple as having the field fire department run up and down both runways with their sirens going and announcing on their loud speakers that a storm is approaching

Food for thought

Kevin



Heather Gollnow
AirVenture Volunteer
43
Posts
13
#2 Posted: 4/2/2011 07:58:46

Kevin,

I live in Winnebago County, which is the same county as OSH.  The storm warning system here is pretty good.  I can hear multiple sirens within my own home. You can read the activation guidelines here .  Hope this helps. 



The engine is the heart of an airplane, but the pilot is its soul. ~Walter Raleigh
Paul Dowgewicz
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
149
Posts
43
#3 Posted: 4/3/2011 09:43:32

On the video message  from Rod & Paul recorded the afternoon after the storm, Paul seems to be a bit agitated that there was no warning on the field prior to the storm. I take that to mean that the EAA Fly-In Convention has that covered.

I know a few years back, the Theater in the Woods program was cut short when a storm was approaching, so it looks like they do monitor weather at Oshkosh. Too bad our car was over at the museum lot, and the buses stopped running. Shoulda stopped at the beer tent. 4" of rain from that storm. Sneakers didn't dry out all week.

 



Joe Drab
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America Member
38
Posts
24
#4 Posted: 4/3/2011 13:12:18

I have never seen or heard what type of warning system EAA has nor what their procedure is during sever weather as to where to go or what to do especially if you are camping with your aircraft or in camp sholler. 

However, that being said, there should be no excuse for campers not to have a weather radio in their tent, camper or motor home.

I have one that works off a crank and batteries, and no matter the conditions , I set it to "alert" mode before I turn in for the night.  Trust me, when the weather gets bad at 2am and that alarm goes off, you know it.

It is definitely money well spent.



Kevin O'halloran
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America Member
30
Posts
3
#5 Posted: 4/3/2011 14:02:52

Joe

I come in with the B2OSH group--usually around 130 aircraft.

Because of what happened at Lakeland --we are coming up with a emergency plan.

We usually have around 30 to 40 small children in our group--will probably have them gather around one of the bathrooms at the first sign of really bad weather---

People with weather radios will tell everyone in their surrounding area about the weather

We have several cars that are parked across  the street to the south---we will make sure every one of those cars have instructions on how to get to the nearest health care.

Will also  have a area to meet in order to get a head count to make sure we know if anyone is missing

Just getting started on this--will post the final plan when we have it

Pray to God we will never need to use this plan---but everyone who goes to Oshkosh and camps--should have some type of plan in case something bad comes up.

Kevin



John Maxfield
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
38
Posts
7
#6 Posted: 4/3/2011 20:03:30

Hi Kevin

I was fortunate to ride out the Sun-N-Fun storm in an exibit building.  I agree that other than vendors with internet connections (trade-a plane in our case), warning of impending serious weather was slim.  We thought that the lack of PA system in the exibit buildings or announcements on the flight line were obvious omissions.  Something I hope Sun-N-Fun improves upon in the future. 

Immediately after the storm I met Paul re-entering the building by Wick's booth, after a short drive around.  I mentioned "just like Oshkosh week, eh Paul"" to which he gave me "the look" that spoke volumes, and said "Nooo, MUCH worse!"  I KNEW what he ment moments later as I glanced outside.

Having been to a LOT of EAA Fly-In's in RFD, then OSH (40+), I can say with certainty that they make every effort to get the word out.  I've been woken at night on the flight line by loud speaker announcements, in Camp Scholler by security cars driving by with bull horns, you name it.  Its the midwest in July, it happens, they know it, and know what it means to take care of the people there.

Its great to have a plan and I see you're well on your way to having a good one.

Happy Landings, See you in OSH!

John Maxfield



Heather Gollnow
AirVenture Volunteer
43
Posts
13
#7 Posted: 4/4/2011 16:29:41

Here's an article on the local news I found today on this issue.



The engine is the heart of an airplane, but the pilot is its soul. ~Walter Raleigh
Kevin O'halloran
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America Member
30
Posts
3
#8 Posted: 4/4/2011 20:50:36

Heather

its good to know that Oshkosh and EAA have a warning system--but I would like to see it published in the material we get when we check into the campgrounds. Do they have a certain type siren to warn of  approaching storms--is it a long single siren--or just a multiple short blasts--is there a all clear siren???? it would be nice to have this material published along with local health care facilities.

Now-- I know there is no way for EAA to cover every possible emergency. That why people should have some type of basic plan they can work off of. People should be responsable for their own safety

One of the things B2OSH did last year was to get a AED (automatic external defibrillator ) everyone knows where its kept.  Part of the sign up material for B2OSH,  has instructions on its use. EVERYONE is suppose  to read it.

Hope we never need it, but we are ready if we do.

Kevin

PS live in Oklahoma, so I know something about the destructive nature of storms



Peter Bednar
24
Posts
1
#9 Posted: 4/5/2011 15:29:48

For us out in Camp Scholler, do we have any real safe places to go during a weather emergency?  Maybe I didn't notice any postings in when I was tent camping out in the beyond, but I didn't see anything specific, and just formulated a 'get in the lowest ditch possible'  response, if something was to come up.  Duck in one of those concrete charcoal disposal pits?



Gerald Voigt
AirVenture Volunteer
26
Posts
7
#10 Posted: 6/22/2011 14:41:50 Modified: 7/15/2011 15:52:34

Winnebago County which Oshkosh is the county seat of has a good early warning system. The system is tested every Saturday at noon and if a siren is found to be not functioning it is quickly serviced or replaced. The Winnebago County Management works closely with the National Weather Service and in my experience as a resident of this county has been more than effective.

If you are in the camp grounds and cannot reach a place of safety, the best alternate is your vehicle, in your seat with your seatbelt fastened.

Ditches offer below ground level protection but be aware of rising water. Its the flying debris which causes most injuries and loss of life.

As we have seen, if the storm is severe enough, other than being underground there isn't a truly safe place ...inside a building or not. Joplin illustrated that!

When weather looks threatening, take notice of where you are at the time, look for suitable place to go should it turn to really nasty!

Get low and cover...its the flying debris which is your greatest threat.

 



Gerald Voigt Neenah, WI
Jason Alexander
AirVenture Volunteer
42
Posts
17
#11 Posted: 6/23/2011 08:32:15

Two years ago was the first time I even heard the tornado sirens being tested and that was on a clear, calm day. I barely heard it. Being from the mountains of NC, none of my friends knew what it was. I had to explain it to them because I'd heard them once when visiting family in north Texas.

If they could put a siren somewhere on the airport, it might be able to help matters.



Laura Million
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerAirVenture Volunteer
32
Posts
12
#12 Posted: 6/23/2011 13:45:05

Good plan Kevin. As pilots we should always have a Plan B or emergency plan.  A few years ago I was in Camp Schollar when a big storm blew through. At first we went into the shower houses. When I saw that a good strong wind would probably blow the building to bits, we decided to make a break for the Country Store - the big red barn. It has a foot thick stone foundation and has been standing for many years.  Gotta be the strongest building on site.



Laura Million
Rob Flansburg
2
Posts
0
#13 Posted: 7/11/2011 14:59:03 Modified: 7/11/2011 15:13:39
Kevin O'halloran wrote:

 

Joe

I come in with the B2OSH group--usually around 130 aircraft.

Because of what happened at Lakeland --we are coming up with a emergency plan.

We usually have around 30 to 40 small children in our group--will probably have them gather around one of the bathrooms at the first sign of really bad weather---

People with weather radios will tell everyone in their surrounding area about the weather

We have several cars that are parked across  the street to the south---we will make sure every one of those cars have instructions on how to get to the nearest health care.

Will also  have a area to meet in order to get a head count to make sure we know if anyone is missing

Just getting started on this--will post the final plan when we have it

Pray to God we will never need to use this plan---but everyone who goes to Oshkosh and camps--should have some type of plan in case something bad comes up.

Kevin

 

Kevin,

Thanks for all you do for B2Osh and particularly the youth of our group.  My 14 year old son and I have traveled to be with Grandpa the past three years and will be in Rockford again next week.  We can't get enough!  Your thoughtfulness in taking the time to put a plan to together to keep us safe again shows what a stand up  guy you are.  I look forward to pizza and Margs on Saturday. 

Think anyone will mind that I stole the B2Osh logo for my avatar?


See you on the North 40

Rob

 

 



John Thompson
127
Posts
8
#14 Posted: 7/11/2011 19:10:37

I seem to recall about 3 years ago in the late afternoon, the PA system gave some warning of approaching storms at Oshkosh. I was in Camp Scholler, and could hear them (but not understand them, I asked what was being said). I was on the eastern end of the campground, so I don't know if they could hear it further west. I don't know if they have PA speakers in that area.

There are ditches, and various buildings where one could concievebly find shelter. Not enough for everyone, but a car would be better than nothing.



Gerald Voigt
AirVenture Volunteer
26
Posts
7
#15 Posted: 7/15/2011 15:55:12

You can now sign up for text messages about weather and traffic updates as well as a separate one for show info...check the AV website for details.

Also if you have a smartphone, you can set Oshkosh as one of your locations on WeatherBug and it too will notify you of impending weather hazards.



Gerald Voigt Neenah, WI