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Remove overspray from canopy

Posted By:
Andy Lumley
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
4
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 9/27/2009 17:55:18

We have a lot of Polyurethane over-spray on to plexiglass, any suggestions on how to remove would be appreciated and none of the "cleaners" will touch it. My guess is that it will have to be a Micro Mesh type process but maybe there's a magic solution I don't know about.



Kristine Bennett
Homebuilder or Craftsman
15
Posts
1
#2 Posted: 10/1/2009 18:35:17
Andy Lumley wrote:

 

We have a lot of Polyurethane over-spray on to plexiglass, any suggestions on how to remove would be appreciated and none of the "cleaners" will touch it. My guess is that it will have to be a Micro Mesh type process but maybe there's a magic solution I don't know about.

You just happen to be in luck I saw this post.  There is a product that is called "Anti-bond 2015" I know West Marine carries it, their part number is 11744804 and it's about 12 dollars.  It is not a solvent that will attack the plastic as far as I know, but to be sure test it.  How it works is it starts at the edges and works in and destroys the bond that the polyurethane has.  It came about do to the needs of a way to remove thru-hull fittings with out destroying the fiberglass hull.

Yes it will lift most all polyurethane paints as well as sealers, a friend found out the hard way. He had to repaint half his cabin top. So mask off where you don't want this stuff! AND be sure to test the masking take. The last time I used it didn't touch the 3M Fine-line tape, I'm sure there are others that will work.

Kristine



remember KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid as well as add lightness to what you are flying!
Duane Lukan
1
Post
0
#3 Posted: 10/2/2009 00:54:50

 

Andy,

Try claying. Search it under “claying cars” or “auto detailing.” It is used to treat painted surfaces on cars. I was left with a very fine overspray on the glazing on my Bonanza by a guy painting nearby.  I don’t know if it was polyurethane. I did a little testing with clay that I got from an automotive paint supply store. I tried only a very small area and it did take the specks off. It also left some very fine scratches. I emphasize very fine.  I needed a compound glass with a very short focal length to detect them. About all I can say now is the scratches are surely better than the specks. When I get back to it I plan to try different methods and maybe different clay brands. Maybe it will require claying followed by Micro Mesh.  

Duane

 



Jeff Point
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
94
Posts
65
#4 Posted: 10/2/2009 02:24:00

The clay bar trick sounds like a great idea, never thought of that.  For the final step, instead of Micro Mesh, try a product called Scratch Off.  It is similar in concept to Micro Mesh, but instead of using sandpaper, it uses liquid abrasives and foam pads turned in a drill motor.

http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/cspages/scratchoff.php



#5 Posted: 10/3/2009 06:05:54

It all depends upon the amount and size of the polyurethane droplets.

If it's two pack polyurethane, then it's a very good paint and will be very hard to remove.

Now IF you've kept your plexiglass well polished with a good wax polish to prevent flysquash sticking and rain to run off easily, it will be much easier as the paint will not have chemically bonded with the screens.

Take a brand new old fshioned razor blade, or large craft knife blade and plenty of soapy water.

VERY GENTLY ease the blade along at a very shallow angle to cut off the paint mist and blobs WITHOUT scratching the plexiglass.

The soapy water will help to avoid scratching.

Wipe away the paint debris regularly with a wet sponge to prevent further scratching and keep the surface wet.

This may take you many hours and try your patience...............don't rush the job unless you really want to buy a new windshield.

Finally, any small traces of paint can be polished out using a proprietry brand of Perspex / Plexiglass cleaner..

Note: If you already had areas of severe scratching before the overspray, then this will probably remain in the scratches.

Nice and gently does it,

Nigel Astbury-Rollason 

 

 

 



#6 Posted: 10/14/2009 17:20:13

I had light overspray on my canopy too - don't know what kind of paint it was.  I cleaned the canopy really well to remove all dust and grit.  Then I used a plastic polish (Mirror Glaze 17) on a T-shirt material to cut the overspray.  Then i polished the canopy with Mirror Glaze 10.  It worked out great, although it was a whole day of work.  It takes patience with the first cut, work on small areas.  Good luck.

Emma



Andy Lumley
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
4
Posts
0
#7 Posted: 11/10/2009 17:59:10

This is an update of my original post and thank you to all who offered suggestions.

Our volunteer used non scratch cleanser (like bon ami) mixed with water to form a paste and also toothpaste and the results were quite good although not polished out yet.

I'd say that while this might not be what I'd use on a very important job for our old glider it's worked just fine.

-Andy