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"Wash in" or "Wash out"

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David Staffeldt
IAC MemberVintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America MemberHomebuilder or Craftsman
39
Posts
17
#1 Posted: 1/10/2010 19:51:46

Is "wash in" or "wash out" necessary in a high wing tube and fabric airplane? What are the pros and cons if any? Any thoughts or insight would be appreciated.

Thanks,

David



Jim Heffelfinger
Homebuilder or Craftsman
256
Posts
43
#2 Posted: 1/10/2010 22:19:34

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washout_(aviation)

 

Wash in - guarantees the wing will stall at the tip first assuring an exciting stall spin characteristic.

 

 

 



Roger Poyner
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
43
Posts
6
#3 Posted: 1/11/2010 18:21:31

I can think of a couple of planes with zero wash out and none with wash in.  By far the most common is to have some washout to make sure the wing tip is flying when the inboard section stalls.  This allows the ailerons to retain effectiveness even in a stall.  It also helps keep the stall from being abrupt.  An abrupt stall can catch a pilot off guard.  Most planes should give the pilot a warning before stalling even those without stall buzzers or horns.   The most common warning I have felt is having the stick or yolk shake as the separated airflow stikes the tail.  At the time the stick begins to shake the outboard portion of the wing with the ailerons is still flying with the air attached.



Chase Balcom
Homebuilder or Craftsman
40
Posts
4
#4 Posted: 1/12/2010 20:37:58

wash out is also best for STOL operation ,..on a 28 foot wing span I usually incorperate 1 inch of wash out on a semi semtrical airfoil,..1.5 inch on a flat bottom airfoil,....up to 3 inches of wash out  on a airfoil with a less then full covered bottom surface depending on  wing span



David Staffeldt
IAC MemberVintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America MemberHomebuilder or Craftsman
39
Posts
17
#5 Posted: 1/12/2010 21:37:38

Thanks for the replys so far. I'm leaning towards no wash out in my wing. My airplane has a  36 foot wing span with the Ribblett airfoil, which has great stall characteristics already. Looking for any bit of cruise speed I can get.  I'm building as light as I can and as clean as I can for my kit.  

 Thanks again for the replys,

   David



Todd Parker
Homebuilder or Craftsman
7
Posts
1
#6 Posted: 1/16/2010 16:11:29

In addition to the improvements in stall characteristics, wash-out can also reduce drag by shaping the lift pattern of the wing at cruise speed to be more elliptical in shape. This can also be used to help keep the airfoil operating in or near the drag bucket if the airfoil has one.

 

Todd Parker



Always thinking about airplanes