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Plywood Gussets

Posted By:
Martin Wilson
16
Posts
4
#1 Posted: 2/11/2010 20:54:29

What's the best way to make plywood gussets? I've tried a hole saw and a circle cutter with varying results.  Any suggestions?  I'm a new builder (VP2) and learning as I go along. . . . .

 

Martin



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#2 Posted: 2/11/2010 21:52:02

Hi Martin, welcome to the forum and to homebulding!

I think you're looking for tips on how to cut the numerous holes that are in the plywood wing ribs on the VP2 (?)

If so, a router might work for you.  I needed to do a similar job on the wing ribs of my Sopwth Pup replica and this video got me started with the basic principle, although I did eventually end up using a table router  - -





Martin Wilson
16
Posts
4
#3 Posted: 2/11/2010 22:24:22

Adam

No, I'm fine with the holes in the ribs, used a hole saw with no problems.  I've almost completed the rudder and have started on the stabilator.  My problem is finding a quick and easy way of making the little semi circular strengthening gussets out of 1/16th ply.  I can do them with a hole saw but they need cleaning up after and it's quite time consuming doing a bunch of them.  I'm looking for a way of punching them out on masse so to speak! 

 

BTW, I did use the router method for cutting out my stabilator ribs, quick and effective.



Joe Norris
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
328
Posts
137
#4 Posted: 2/12/2010 12:05:14

Martin,

Do they need to be semi-circular?  Most times you can get away with triangular (or rectangular or whatever).  I made mine using a very fine tooth blade on my table saw.  I stacked a number of sheets of plywood up and cut out the gussets, making a whole bunch at one time.  Semi-circular may look a little fancier, but there's no strength advantage over straight-sided gussets.

Cheers!

Joe



Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate
Joanne Palmer
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
276
Posts
68
#5 Posted: 2/12/2010 16:51:22

I'd stack them up, clamp the stack and then cut them out using either a router or a table saw.  With a table saw I'd make the gussets triangular or rectangular with clipped (Dogeared) corners.  It isn't that much heavier and you can get them cut in a jiffy.  Once their cut, put them in a plastic bag of say 25 or a hundred to keep them from absorbing moisture or oil.  Then take as many as you'll need to make the ribs/trusses you're going to do in that session.  

 



Martin Wilson
16
Posts
4
#6 Posted: 2/12/2010 19:21:04

Thanks All.  I never thought of making them triangular!  I was just dutifully following the plans without thinking for myself. . . . . .



Wayne Bressler
Homebuilder or Craftsman
89
Posts
30
#7 Posted: 2/14/2010 21:41:23 Modified: 2/14/2010 21:58:17

Martin,
 
You need a collection of vintage EAA magazines to get you through, my friend!  Here's a punch designed exclusively for this purpose.  You can make it yourself.  From the March 1960 Sport Aviation magazine.
 
http://www.oshkosh365.org/saarchive/eaa_articles/1960_03_13.pdf

If this isn't exactly what you're looking for, then I don't know what is. 
 
Best of luck on your project!

 



Tricycles are for babies. Taildraggers, Inc. www.taildraggersinc.com
Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#8 Posted: 2/14/2010 22:01:51

Outstanding use of the online archive Wayne!  A tip that will be 50 years old next month, still valuable today.



Martin Wilson
16
Posts
4
#9 Posted: 2/15/2010 22:35:19

Wayne

 

Thank you so much, that's exactly what I need.   What a marvellous resource we have available in "Sport Aviation", I obviously need to spend some time reading. . . .

 

Thanks again



Greg Heckman
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
10
Posts
1
#10 Posted: 2/21/2010 08:54:19

I had to make a bunch of 1/16" triangular gussets for a recent project and used a good sharp paper cutter.  Made a nice clean edge and was fast.  A sheet metal shear - if you have access to one works good too.     Greg