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Color Home Movies of Homebuilding ... Circa 1948!

Posted By:
Hal Bryan
827
Posts
501
#1 Posted: 4/19/2010 12:06:13 Modified: 4/19/2010 12:37:34

This is some amazing color home movie footage of a group of 4 friends in Valparaiso, IN, building a Knight Twister from plans in 1948. This airplane went on to be one of the first 21 aircraft to come to the first EAA fly-in in Milwaukee!

 

Here's Part I:

 


And Here's Part II:



 

There's a bit more info on this particular airframe (now hanging in the lobby of a YMCA) here:
 
http://www.post-trib.com/lifestyles/2163634,iqknighttwister0418.article  

And you'll see it mentioned as being among the first 21 attendees at the first Milwaukee fly-in here:
 
http://www.oshkosh365.org/saarchive/eaa_articles/1953_10_03.pdf  



Online Community Manager - EAA
David Darnell
61
Posts
18
#2 Posted: 4/19/2010 17:49:02

  Fascinating!- The part that caught my eye was no power tools. Also thought the "spray booth" was not too effective at keeping dirt & bugs off the paint......



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#3 Posted: 4/19/2010 17:51:28

Awesome quality footage... just like the kind of things that modern homebuilders post on YouTube, except filmed in 1948!

Is there any homebuilder who hasn't done this?

 



Joe Scheibinger
Homebuilder or Craftsman
16
Posts
6
#4 Posted: 4/23/2010 00:27:38

This is an incredible piece of footage! I was waiting for Wally and the Beaver to show up! This footage should be in the EAA Museum!



Joe S.
Robin Haynes
IAC Member
1
Post
2
#5 Posted: 4/23/2010 09:40:46

I love that he's spraypainting with a cigarette in his hand!



William Verwey
2
Posts
0
#6 Posted: 4/23/2010 13:05:58

Just awesome! Can someone tell me how to save a You Tube video? I don't want to lose these. Priceless, even if it is a bit 'campy" by today's standards. The rapid handpropping of the still moving (!?!) prop was wild enough, eh?



Hal Bryan
827
Posts
501
#7 Posted: 4/23/2010 13:43:24

William - there are a number of tools available for making streaming video available for offline viewing. The one I've had most success with is called Keep Vid: http://keepvid.com/

NOTE: This is not a  recommendation or endorsement of any tool or activity that might possibly present even the merest suggestion of any level of infringement of anyone's intellectual property or running afoul of the terms of use of any website of any kind anywhere. Your mileage may vary. Your parents have to put it together. Etc., etc., etc.

 



Online Community Manager - EAA
David Oviatt
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
1
#8 Posted: 4/23/2010 14:07:55

Thanks for posting this.  Great, historical, and fun.  I didn't have sound...I'm assuming there wasn't any?

I guess they were just mainly video film cameras back then.  The video quality is incredible.



Jim Hann
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
125
Posts
41
#9 Posted: 4/23/2010 20:05:22

William,

Real Player also downloads and will convert the video, but it is S L O W.  Again, not an endorsement, but it is free.

 

Did anybody notice the entire cowling and most of the sheetmetal changed from the backyard to the airport?  Still an awesome look into the past and a lot of fun to watch.

And yes, Adam you hit it on the head, who hasn't done that!

 

Jim



http://sites.google.com/site/jimscavaliersa1025/ http://picasaweb.google.com/CozyCanard http://sites.google.com/site/cavalieraircraft/
Ralph King
437
Posts
50
#10 Posted: 4/24/2010 19:00:49 Modified: 4/24/2010 19:05:43

Great stuff, you all are going to keep it up until you get an old man (me) motivated to start a project..

 

Ralph

 



Jim Cunningham
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
26
Posts
4
#11 Posted: 4/25/2010 12:31:00

Beyond the content, another interesting aspect of this is the production itself... things like dissolves and shot transitions like those seen here required some pretty serious equipment-- any money-- back in 1948. This is great stuff.



Jim Cunningham Normal IL CFII