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Would I need special training to build an aircraft.

Posted By:
Daniel Proeger
12
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0
#1 Posted: 12/9/2010 17:39:33

I would be interested in replicating a vintage aircraft. If I use the original plans would I need any training as an aeronautical engineer or something.



Andy Gamache
Homebuilder or Craftsman
122
Posts
28
#2 Posted: 12/11/2010 12:56:02

The short answer is no. Definitely not a college degree.

 

The longer answer is that you will probably need to learn some building skills. Everybody has gone through the process, so it's definitely doable. Hopefully others will chime in with the pros and cons of the project you're looking at.



Corey Butcher
Homebuilder or Craftsman
22
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#3 Posted: 12/11/2010 13:34:49

Daniel,

I did just that. Plus I had to draw my own plans.

I attended ACU* and graduated with honors by flying my own creation.

Collecting all the study materials and studying for hours, experimenting, tinkering and just pondering while gazing at my progress, was how I did it.

What airplane are you considering?

 

Corey

*(ACU= Arm Chair University)



Daniel Proeger
12
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0
#4 Posted: 12/11/2010 13:56:05

I am thinking of some type of craft on the order of a Curtiss Jennie or a WWI bird.



Corey Butcher
Homebuilder or Craftsman
22
Posts
1
#5 Posted: 12/11/2010 14:24:42

Ah, My kind a plane!

I built a WWI 1915 Voisin. A bomber from France.

Lots of info on the web for WWI replicas.

http://www.airdromeairplanes.com

http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/index.php

http://www.nieuports.com/

http://replicafighter.org

Lots of Yahoo groups too.



Paul Thomas
Homebuilder or Craftsman
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#6 Posted: 12/13/2010 17:08:18

You wouldn't need that level of training, building an airplane is not rocket science. However, as with anything, there is a learning curve. I firmly believe anyone can learn the skills required to build an airplane.

Where do you live? Finding a local mentor is important; I would never have started if I didn't have one to learn the basics from.



Rick Holland
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
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1
#7 Posted: 1/8/2011 19:21:04

I took gas and tig welding classes at a local community college and a couple EAA Sport Air workshops, not expensive and a lot of fun.

 



Frank Giger
Homebuilder or Craftsman
117
Posts
33
#8 Posted: 1/11/2011 00:17:33

If you're going for an actual replica - not a representation in tube and gusset construction - you're thinking the wrong way in skills required.

You'll be far better suited taking a wood working class and becoming friends with carpenters and cabinet makers than delving into calculus and drinking coffee with guys from NASA. 

At any rate, your question is sort of loaded since we don't know your background.  For your average farmboy there isn't anything too daunting in the skills to pick up, since he's been around most of them all his life - but if someone were a city type that never drove a nail to so much as hang a picture there's a lot of basic stuff to pick up.

The mantra is as old as history itself - find someone who knows and can teach.  Learn from them.

Best thing to do is build a rudder.  Most of the skills required for the rest of the build will present themselves in a rudder build, and it's one of the least expensive parts to put together.

I'd also serious recommend you look into a tube-and-gusset build for your first plane.  It's the least expensive and requires the fewest specialized skills of all types.  Airdrome Airplanes has a fantastic set of offerings at super great prices (and loads of support).