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A COATING TO REDUCE WATER TAKEOFF AND TIME OF SEAPLANES

Posted By:
Richard Jimenez
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
1
Post
0
#1 Posted: 12/15/2010 10:36:23

A COATING TO REDUCE WATER TAKEOFF DISTANCE AND TIME FOR SEAPLANES

 

We are experimenting with a coating that is applied with a paint brush or roller that after it dries will reduce the coefficient of friction between the water and the painted surface.  This coating looks like it will do much to reduce the takeoff distance and time in regards to seaplane water takeoffs.

 

Tank tests conducted by the Ocean Engineering Department of the University of Rhode Island using electronic measurement apparatus demonstrated that this coating when applied to the surface of an object has a clearly measurable value of reducing hydrodynamic drag between 8% and 14%.

 

That is clear evidence that this coating does work.  However, there is another test that was conducted that is even more exciting.

 

 

Hydromer’s drag tests on a lake consisting of a row boat being pulled by a powerboat, connected via a tow line and a force gauge, the row boat first having no coating applied and then again with coating applied showed the following results.  The reduction in towing force was found to vary from none at 4 MPH to 17% at 25 MPH.  How much drag reduction would their be at 40 or 50 MPH that some seaplanes require for takeoff speeds, and what ramifications would that have on take off distances and take off times?  The answer is I don’t know, but it sure would be fun finding out.

 

I am looking to find someone that has a seaplane that would be interested in using their seaplane to conduct some tests with this coating and see how much it can reduce seaplane takeoffs from water.  I live in the St. Louis area and this is not seaplanes country, however if by chance a person would be interested and is close to St. Louis that would be great as it would make it easier to coordinate testing and communications.  Plus it would make it easier to prepare an article for Sport Aviation on what was discovered by the tests.  However, that does not exclude people that live some distance from St. Louis from contacting me.

 

Richard Jimenez

 

If interested contact me at rjad12@centurylink.net     

 



Darrell Whiteaker
Homebuilder or Craftsman
14
Posts
1
#2 Posted: 12/16/2010 14:41:02

Hello Richard,

Unfortunately my plane is not anywhere close to being done. However i would suggest you try posting at www.seaplaneforum.com and you might get a helping hand. Sounds like it would be an interesting experiment. I would be very much interested in the results. What kind of treatment is this? Is it a rough texture or smooth?

skeeter

 

 

 



Tom Hackel
Homebuilder or Craftsman
126
Posts
22
#3 Posted: 12/20/2010 21:03:01
Richard Jimenez wrote:

 

A COATING TO REDUCE WATER TAKEOFF DISTANCE AND TIME FOR SEAPLANES

 

We are experimenting with a coating that is applied with a paint brush or roller that after it dries will reduce the coefficient of friction between the water and the painted surface.  This coating looks like it will do much to reduce the takeoff distance and time in regards to seaplane water takeoffs.

 

Tank tests conducted by the Ocean Engineering Department of the University of Rhode Island using electronic measurement apparatus demonstrated that this coating when applied to the surface of an object has a clearly measurable value of reducing hydrodynamic drag between 8% and 14%.

 

That is clear evidence that this coating does work.  However, there is another test that was conducted that is even more exciting.

 

 

Hydromer’s drag tests on a lake consisting of a row boat being pulled by a powerboat, connected via a tow line and a force gauge, the row boat first having no coating applied and then again with coating applied showed the following results.  The reduction in towing force was found to vary from none at 4 MPH to 17% at 25 MPH.  How much drag reduction would their be at 40 or 50 MPH that some seaplanes require for takeoff speeds, and what ramifications would that have on take off distances and take off times?  The answer is I don’t know, but it sure would be fun finding out.

 

I am looking to find someone that has a seaplane that would be interested in using their seaplane to conduct some tests with this coating and see how much it can reduce seaplane takeoffs from water.  I live in the St. Louis area and this is not seaplanes country, however if by chance a person would be interested and is close to St. Louis that would be great as it would make it easier to coordinate testing and communications.  Plus it would make it easier to prepare an article for Sport Aviation on what was discovered by the tests.  However, that does not exclude people that live some distance from St. Louis from contacting me.

 

Richard Jimenez

 

If interested contact me at rjad12@centurylink.net     

 

 

Just curious, you have used no coating as a Baseline. Are you going to prove it Better than something, such as a Carnauba base wax? (Car Wax)