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6 place homebuilt

Posted By:
John Coody
11
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 2/24/2011 13:50:33

I've done extensive searching and I've only found two designs still being offered.  So, I'm thinking of starting my own design.  I have no idea where to start.  I have not yet built an airplane and I have no special design or constructing skills.  Any thoughts on where I should start?  I know pretty much what I want the airplane to be able to do and I believe I would like to make it out of either fiberglass or carbon fiber.

Thanks!

JA




Richard Bowie
Homebuilder or Craftsman
1
Post
0
#2 Posted: 2/26/2011 04:29:34

The Compair 8 is a contender. We completed ours in 2001 and have flown it over 900 hrs so far. The Walter turbine has been remakably trouble free. The performance matches the mfg.s specs. Only downside is cost of fuel and insurance. But hey, crusing in the middle lattitudes with 5 of your buddies at 220mph....priceless!!!

 



John Coody
11
Posts
0
#3 Posted: 2/26/2011 08:14:03

I agree!  The Comp Air series is very attractive.  I've been looking at the 7 with the useable weight upgrades.  The only downside is that my family would really prefer club seating.



Steve Fabiszak
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
103
Posts
32
#4 Posted: 2/27/2011 19:28:42

Wasn't there an IO540 powered  high wing tube and fabric kit available about 5 years ago? I seem to remember seeing it the Sport Av. It was a big cavernous but slow airplane. The builder put wicker chairs, end tables and throw rugs inside. Reminded me of someone's front porch. I thought it was cool.

 



John Coody
11
Posts
0
#5 Posted: 3/2/2011 11:59:18

Steve, sounds fascinating!  But slow doesn't fit my mission well.

Anyone have thoughts, or possibly could point me in the right direction for beginning a new design (or an old design renewed)?  I'm thinking B36TC or Saratoga in composite (either fiberglass or carbon fiber).  Is it possible to replicate an existing aircraft?  If so, what are the legal and ethical ramifications?

I have three main purposes in designing and building an airplane.  1. For education, 2. To log time towards an A&P, and 3. To hold the repairman's certificate when it is complete.

Thanks!  JA




John Coody
11
Posts
0
#6 Posted: 3/2/2011 12:00:39

The Catbird would be awesome too but the plans were never sold for that one



Reiff Lorenz
Homebuilder or Craftsman
26
Posts
3
#7 Posted: 3/2/2011 13:24:48

Here are the kits I know about that have 6 or more seats. All of them have a full-fuel range of 800 or more miles.

 

Model                                   Seats           Cost:Kit/Min/Max               Cruise(kts)       Useful load - full fuel


Aircraft Designs Stallion 6                    200/500/?                             204                             520
Comp Air 10                        10                 102/250/425                          156                           1480
Comp Air 6                          5-6                45/66/100                               143                            820
Comp Air 7                          6                    66/87/325                               200                           280
Comp Air 7SLX                   6                    78/98/375                               182                             480
Comp Air 8                          8                    90/187/425                            182                            580
Comp Air 9                          8                    295/770/1200                        220                          1600
Murphy Moose                6                    ?/100/130                                121                           1020
Sherpa K650T                     8                    ?/725/845                              171                             924

 

If you want to design your own aircraft, I recommend starting with Daniel Raymer's book on aircraft design:

http://www.amazon.com/Aircraft-Design-Conceptual-Approach-Education/dp/1563472813

Hope this helps!



John Coody
11
Posts
0
#8 Posted: 3/2/2011 13:48:29 Modified: 3/2/2011 13:49:17

Thanks Reiff, I did stumble on these as well.  The Moose and Sherpa after my first post - although I'm not sure that the Sherpa is still being offered.  I also tend to think of all of the Comp Air models as mostly the same with slight variations although the details do make for vastly different handling characteristics and useful loads.  Perhaps this is a failing on my part.  Unfortunately the Stallion is a bit outside of my price range.

I am surprised that no low wing versions exist though.  Thanks also for the book suggestion!

JA


 



Spencer Gould
Homebuilder or Craftsman
32
Posts
1
#9 Posted: 3/8/2011 00:39:05

 

I would look at the Epic as well, not sure if they are pure certified or still offer kits but the performance numbers are impressive. Its pricey but they have a lot of good ideas in this bird.

 

http://www.epicaircraft.com/LT.html

 

If you are committed to Designing an aircraft I would get a hold of every major book you can Raymer, Bruhn, Niu, Bingles, Rutan etc. Here is a list I created for my old chapter

 

http://www.eaa99.com/newsletters/ch99-readingresources.pdf

 

I would also attend Oshkosh or Sun N Fun with a digital camera and get pics of everything you can. I went to these shows for a full decade before diving into what I’m in now, not to mention a BSAE from Embry-Riddle, working for Piper & Pratt & Whitney.

 

After working on a couple aircraft builds I’ve designed and am building an all composite single seater. The biggest challenge you are going to face in designing an aircraft is getting it done, every extra you add to it makes that goal harder to reach. Also higher complexity equals greater design time. Engine selection, weight & balance, stability & control can all be real bad “got yas” if its not done right.

 

Also if you plan on having aircraft insurance your pilot qualifications will need to match the aircraft. i.e. expect a ridiculous quote if you just got your private rating and you would like to be an owner operator on a P-51. They want to see significant comparable time in type.  

 

Before coping a design or aspects of a design make sure to get some air time in what you would like to fly and make sure its really right for you. My aircraft is some where between a 601 & a RV-8 in terms of general performance, I made sure to get flight hours in both of these aircraft before getting to deep into this project.   

 

Hope this helps,

 

Spencer

 

EAA Technical Counselor 5426



Paul O'Dea
3
Posts
0
#10 Posted: 3/25/2011 13:38:44

I'll throw a few more out there:

Lionheart Staggerwing

Morrison-6 (formerly Barr) kind of a 206 looking thing

ACD SUA-7

Velocity XL-5 (5 seats, if you want to leave somebody behind)

Avia-Bellanca Skyrocket (they still have a website, don't know what's up with the plans idea)

 

Paul



Galin Hernandez
15
Posts
13
#11 Posted: 4/9/2011 21:49:45

PULSAR has a 6 seat composite low wing design. I saw the prototype at the factory last year and it looks interesting. I am not sure if it will be offered as a kit or it was just a concept airplane.


PULSAR 6 Seater.jpg