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Can you name this airplane?(2)

Posted By:
Hal Bryan
827
Posts
501
#1 Posted: 10/26/2009 13:23:59 Modified: 10/26/2009 13:25:33


Monoplane Inverted Gear.jpg

 

Unlike some of our previous threads, this is a question, not a contest. This picture appeared in a book called Augstine's Laws by Norman Augustine, vice president of Martin-Marietta. It was used, as noted, to illustrate one of his business maxims, "Even the exuberant should have a contingency plan."

The researcher that asked us about it has already contacted Jane's who weren't able to assist.

So how about you? Any of you know the story behind this picture? Did someone build a monoplane somewhere between 1910 - 1913 (my guess) with an extra set of wheels up top, even as a joke?

Let us know if you have any insight!

 



Online Community Manager - EAA
Reggie Smalls
Homebuilder or Craftsman
126
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49
#2 Posted: 10/27/2009 21:15:00

Sorry I can't name the plane but it did remind me of Craig Hosking's amazing Pitts from a few years back.




Robert Dingley
Homebuilder or Craftsman
161
Posts
38
#3 Posted: 10/29/2009 19:25:47

I could be wrong.

It appears to be the Barnaby-Farnsworth "TWIT." An early, purpose built design to conduct high speed inspections of the planned England to France tunnel. (Chunnel)  The dual wheel arrangement was a hastiy added safety feature. Latter experiments were conducted with a large carbon arc inspection lamp mounted between the pilots feet and projecting upward. Unfortunately, the prototype was lost for unknown reasons while conducting lamp tests on a moonless night.

The Great War of 1914-1918 put a halt to the project. This caused dismay among the workers at the B.F. Works, who informerly named it "The Bat" for its ability to descend into caves and tunnels. The two remaining unfinished airframes were converted to horse drawn shays.

Bob Dingley

Pace, FL

EAA759930



Andrew King
Vintage Aircraft Association Member
83
Posts
49
#4 Posted: 10/29/2009 23:38:44

It's a 1913 Grade Monoplane, flown by Gustav Tweer, and supposedly built for looping:

 

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1914/1914%20-%200399.html



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
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381
#5 Posted: 10/30/2009 08:36:00

Great work Andrew!


tweer.jpg



Mike Edwards
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
130
Posts
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#6 Posted: 11/2/2009 12:23:59
Robert Dingley wrote:

 

It appears to be the Barnaby-Farnsworth "TWIT." An early, purpose built design to conduct high speed inspections of the planned England to France tunnel. (Chunnel)  The dual wheel arrangement was a hastiy added safety feature. Latter experiments were conducted with a large carbon arc inspection lamp mounted between the pilots feet and projecting upward. Unfortunately, the prototype was lost for unknown reasons while conducting lamp tests on a moonless night.

The Great War of 1914-1918 put a halt to the project. This caused dismay among the workers at the B.F. Works, who informerly named it "The Bat" for its ability to descend into caves and tunnels. The two remaining unfinished airframes were converted to horse drawn shays.

Bob Dingley

Bob, good job!  I suggest you re-post this message on 1 April 2010.