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ARUP Aircraft

Posted By:
Ivan Truyaert
Homebuilder or Craftsman
7
Posts
2
#1 Posted: 7/10/2010 14:34:08

  Does anyone know if there are any of the original ARUP flying wing aircraft still around and or in  airworthy condition?  Are there any types of blue prints or drawings still in existence?

                                                                                Thanks, Ivan 



Kevin Golden
Homebuilder or Craftsman
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0
#2 Posted: 7/15/2010 21:41:48

Ivan,

  I could go on and on on the ARUP.  This is what I have found.  Nothing of the original ARUPS exist.  There have been a few replicas built over the years.  I wrote the Smithsonian and they sent me the best drawings I have on the original ARUP.  It is possible with those drawings for someone with good mechanical aptitude to build a good replica.  The best ARUP based replica with modern design are the Milt Hatfield Little Birds.  There were 3 of these planes.  All flew.  Check out my home page here for a photo of the first replica in flight. 

Kevin.

tinyauto@aol.com



Marty King
Homebuilder or Craftsman
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#3 Posted: 8/8/2010 09:58:51 Modified: 9/5/2010 09:12:26

Marty King here, I apprenticed with Milt Hatfield from the age of 12 until 18. I helped build the three "Little Birds" and 4 other flying wing designs prior to them. None of the original Arups survived. Milt lent them a Henderson engine for one of the early models and he test flew number 2&3. Milts daughter sold number 1, 2&3 Little Birds along with all the drawings to a guy in (revised) Kansas.

 


Little Bird1.jpg

 



There is no fun in keeping the "Shiny side up" Marty King A&P EAA 62608
Ivan Truyaert
Homebuilder or Craftsman
7
Posts
2
#4 Posted: 8/8/2010 12:45:28

Marty,

Thanks for the info. I am about 10 minutes from SBN in South Bend. That's why it peaked my curiousity. Too bad there isn't any good info to go on. I think it would make an interesting project.

 

                                                                            Ivan



Marty King
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
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0
#5 Posted: 8/8/2010 17:30:29 Modified: 8/8/2010 17:31:45

Ivan,

While I do not have prints I know we used a an NACA 2412 airfoil and while the first wing had a straight leading edge Milt swept the later ones 3-5 degrees. The root at the fuse was about 24" and the tip rib was 12", the spar double tapered, so the wing had natural dihedral. He made the outer 6' of both the wings hinged so it could be easily trailered. If I remember the span was 18' and 12' in length at the fuse.

We started out with a CG of 27% and we kept moving it back until we were at 30-31%. CG was not real critical for flight, we did it for trim reasons. The elevons were spring loaded to help lighten the control pressure as the surfaces were rather large. I know several local modelers did replicate the "Little Birds" in RC format back in the late 80's.

 

Milt's favorite trick was to take a piece of paper, fold it in the center, cut a radius on one end. Then he opened the heal shaped outline up, folded the leading edge several times and sailed it across his shop. These were very stable aircraft. The only other one who flew any of them besides Milt was Lowell Farrand from Legionier, In. He flew #2 with the 447 Rotax.

 

George Watt from EAA chapter 132 in Elkhart has some great video of our building and flight testing.

 

Cheers,

Marty

 



There is no fun in keeping the "Shiny side up" Marty King A&P EAA 62608
Kevin Golden
Homebuilder or Craftsman
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#6 Posted: 9/3/2010 18:40:52

First.  Marty, I have been looking for you.  In my research I knew you were involved in the building of the Little Birds.  I will attempt to contact you with a direct email after writing this post.  I will keep this post as short as possible.

Second.  None of the LBs went to Ohio.   I own ALL 3 little birds, spare parts with molds to manufacture and have them here at my home in Missouri.  Retrieving these airplanes was quite an adventure.  I made 3 trips to Indiana to haul them back to the Kansas City area.   The prototype LB #1 is in horrible condition as it had been mostly eaten by racoons.  It had folding wings at one time, but the wing was made non folding by a solid rear spar.  Remember, it was a prototype and it seems changes were being done all the time.  LB #2 looks to be mostly flyable except for a broken main gear leg.  I don't know how it was broke and neither did Milts daughter.  She acted surprised that it was broke.  The main gear legs on LB2 and 3 look to be a 1X4 oak board!  LB #3 looked flyable when I bought it.  I took the wing covering off and found some things in the leading edge I don't like.   With the leading edge upgraded a bit and new covering, I think it will be fine.  I did get an extra set of LB3 elevons and think I will install them on this plane.

All 3 LB's are cruedly built.  They were intended to be flying test beds.  Modification "scars" are visible in places.  LB#1 is steel tube fuse with wood wings.  LB#2 and #3 are about 65% fiberglass with wood for the main structure in the wings. 

Everyone asks me my plans for the planes.  I would like to fly LB#3 myself, evaluate the plane and go from there.  I do have a job that requires a lot from me making it hard to work on the planes.  I also have a hobby of Vintage micro cars that takes up a lot of time.  Too many toys and not enough play time seems to be the problem. 

The photo of the airplane hanging at the airport in Indiana is the two seat ARUP S4 replica model.  I talked to the guy a couple of times who built it.  He also built the missle replica hanging near the plane.  One fact that I think is interesting is the original ARUPs door was on the bottom of the plane.  It was unique for sure.  The little birds are entered by climbing over the front of the wing similar to a minimax. 

Here is an interesting Youtube of the original ARUP:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nxz1UF67EQI

Anyone wanting to talk directly out of forum may write me. 

Kevin Golden.  Tinyauto@aol.com



Marty King
Homebuilder or Craftsman
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#7 Posted: 9/5/2010 09:29:36

Kevin,

 

It is good to hear from you. I actually took the picture in your avatar on one of the early test flights of #1. Yes, they are all roughly built, as none were expected to be a "keeper", all were for development. I am sure you have seen the results of testing as we cut the seatback out of number 1 and moved the CG rearward. The little birds were always in flux. I remember the gear breaking on #2 but I forget the details of what happened, but it was a hangar incident and was not in motion. Milt had intended on making a fiberglass plank gear but never got it done. He spent most of his last days trying to pull a canopy for number 3. He never did get a full one, so the half canopy was the result. I tried to get him to send the plug to the plastic shop in Dayton but he wanted to do it himself. Milt had quite a design for the elevon mixer. I welded up a bunch of the part. He refused to use anything but welded seam conduit, I wanted 4130.....

 

Have you made contact with George Watt from EAA chapter 132? He and Bernie Rice video taped many of the test flights.

 

I await your email,

 

Marty



There is no fun in keeping the "Shiny side up" Marty King A&P EAA 62608