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Sport Pilot J-3 Transition to Low Wing Sport

Posted By:
C Glenn Brown
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 6/28/2010 15:30:50

My training route is incomplete.  I want to end up SP, flying my 80HP Sonex experimental that I completed.

10 years ago, I did about 50 hours in C152 (soloed it  then) and C172.  Quit, due to lack of interest, but then built my plane.

18 months ago,  about 35 hours in J-3 Piper (no solo), then 15 hours in Evector in Class C (no solo), then this year about  35 hours (Recreational Pilot, with 3rd Class Medical) in C172 (soloed about 5 hours).

I suddenly think recr pilot not good enough path toward SP flights more than 50 miles.  So thinking of resuming J-3 training to finish my SP license (less money, quicker, more confidence), although it is about 2 hours from my home.

How difficult will it probably be for me to transition to my Sonex, after get my SP via Piper J-3? 

A lot of my problem seems to be my advanced age (74), as well as extreme caution, but good health.   Of course, I plan to get transition training in a Sonex before flying the required Phase I  40 hours off (a good pilot made its first flight for me).

I do think all the training was beneficial experience, just a little slow and expensive.

 

Thanks,

CG

 

 



Jerry Rosie
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
482
Posts
101
#2 Posted: 6/29/2010 08:11:30

Glen - I got my Sport Pilot ticket at about your age - so it is possible.  Being older, it may take you a bit longer to get the basics ingrained into the gray matter, but being older also gives you better judgement.  My recommendation is to go with the J3 training - it is something that no one can ever take away from you.  The J3 will teach you good stick and rudder skills that, with some transition training, will stand you in good stead in any airplane you later decide to fly.  Good luck and let us know how you are advancing.

 

 



Cheers, Jerry NC22375 out of 07N
C Glenn Brown
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
0
#3 Posted: 6/29/2010 08:45:49

Thanks for your encouragement.

Next question:  I think I know the answer, but what is the reasonable way to fulfill?  What do SP's have to do, to transition from one kind of SP plane to another?   From my understanding of reading the FAR-AIM, an SP must get transition training with a CFI with an endorsement for each catergory, class, type and model.

For example, in the SP ticket world, even if you could legally fly one model of Ramos, you can not fly another Ramos model, without a specific CFI endorsement.  It's difficult to find a CFI within reasonable distances that can do these endorsements.

A PP does not seem to have such restrictions.  

Of course, insurance is another matter.  The insurer would want to know you had training in anything you flew.

 



Jerry Rosie
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
482
Posts
101
#4 Posted: 7/1/2010 11:49:49

Glen - I am vaguely remembering that the 'make and model' requirement has been modified in the not too distant past, but since I have little or no intention of buying another airplane, I didn't pay much attention to it.  That is a drawback, but rather minor when compared to passing a physical every two years. 

Find an airplane you want to fly, find an instructor who is familiar with that airplane and spend a couple of hours with him or her and you are set for as long as that airplane satisfies you.  Go for a PP and you will be paying an MD to look in your ears to see if he can see all the way through every two years to stay legal.  And heaven forbid, he finds something wrong and your medical is denied, that is the end of your flying career unless you have big bucks and enough luck to get a special issuance on your medical which again needs to be renewed every year or two. 

The hassle of finding a quilified CFI in the airplane you want to fly is much less and it only has to be done once..

Just my opinion, maybe someone else can chime in here and expand the horizons....

 



Cheers, Jerry NC22375 out of 07N
Jerry Rosie
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
482
Posts
101
#5 Posted: 7/1/2010 11:58:19

Glenn - I just realized that I never did address your initial question about transitioning from a high wing to a low wing airplane.  When I did just that - from an Aeronca Champ to a MiniMax 103.  I was absolutely amazed how much easier it was to land when you could see the runway all the way around the pattern and not have it disappear as the wing blocked it from view on turning from base to final.  Low wings are easier in that regard, just not as easy to go sight seeing if you want to look straight down (also harder to win the fly in's flour bombing contest).

 



Cheers, Jerry NC22375 out of 07N