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Interested in LSA Powered Parachutes... Where do I start?

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Joe Van Der Sanden
AirVenture Volunteer
5
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#1 Posted: 8/20/2010 22:49:22

I am very interested in learning how to fly powered parachutes. I have done some limited research and what I have turned up is a couple of powered parachute club web-pages that claim that I can get a powered parachute LSA license in around 12 days am I wrong to be a bit skeptical of this? Regardless of if you can or cant achieve this in 12 days, is it really safe to be let loose in the sky after less than two weeks of instruction?



Ed Connelly
2
Posts
1
#2 Posted: 8/26/2010 23:09:29

Hi Joe,  You need a Sport Pilot License to fly a PPC.  Please check this site for the basic requirements for that certificate.  You will need to pass a FAA written exam, fly a minimum of 12 hours and obtain the permission of your instructor to take your flight test.  PPCs need almost calm winds for students.  Because of that requirement, often planned training cannot be accomplished and the time to get a license can run into many months.   The most practical scenario is for a student and instructor to agree that both set aside approximately a ten to twelve day period where they will both be available to fly at all times the weather permits.  Also, you will need to have your written passed before you do your flight training.  Besides a CFI in PPC, you will need an SLSA PPC for instruction and a DPE to give you your flight test.  If you live in the midwest, all of the ingredients you need to get your training and your license are available at Six Chuter Midwest Flight Center operating out of Wautoma, Wis., about 30 minutes west of Oshkosh.  920-743-9027  Ed Connelly   P.S. Yes, it is safe as long as you follow the rules.



Joe Van Der Sanden
AirVenture Volunteer
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0
#3 Posted: 8/27/2010 19:37:24

Thank you for your reply; since posting that I have read about most of that and i dont like the idea of swinging around under a parachute like a pendulum, especially as a student pilot. I am going to college right now so I dont really have the ability to set aside two weeks to maybe go flying. I have since turned to ultralights, I have flown solid wing-ed aircraft most of my life and that is where my aviation dreams lie I guess. You seem pretty knowledgeable on this subject, do you know anything about ultralight training? I read the EAA page about the proccesses involved and I read all the ultralight FAR's, where else can I look for info?



Michael Glasgow
Homebuilder or Craftsman
32
Posts
2
#4 Posted: 9/3/2010 02:14:53

The United States Ultralight Association is geared toward true Ultralights.   I checked their lists, and there are not any ultralight instructors or clubs that are part of the USUA in Wisconsin.  EAA has some information about Ultralights, including instructors and manufacturers on the Ultralights page  (it should link)  There are quite a few fixed wing instructors in Wisconsin.  Good luck



Long flights, smooth air, and soft landings,
Jerry Rosie
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
482
Posts
101
#5 Posted: 9/3/2010 10:32:51

Just to expand on your comments, Michael, there aren't any ultralight instructors anywhere these days.  The Ultralight Instructor (known as a BFI - Basic Flight Instructor) designation disappeared along with the "fat ultralight" waiver which permitted a two seat "ultralight" to be used for training.  These "fat Ultralights" have either been registered as LSA or are good for only lawn ornaments these days.  The Ultralight vehicle still exists and is still legal and the pilot of such a vehicle still needs no certification or licensing to fly legally.  Flying an ultralight safely is anothr story - even certificated pilots should get instruction before trying to fly these fun, but different, vehicles.  Where to get that instruction is another quetion - finding a certified LSA instructor willing to instruct in an ultralight-like LSA will take a great deal of research and the best place to start is at your local airport.  Talk to the ramp rats and the hangar flyers who get their morning coffee at the FBO.  Good luck and remember the Prime Directive -- Have Fun!!.. 

 



Cheers, Jerry NC22375 out of 07N
Tom Henry
AirVenture Volunteer
4
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0
#6 Posted: 9/8/2010 21:08:10

Joe,

Don't give up on PPC's quite yet. As a fixed wing pilot you have a very big lead on those with not flight experience when it comes to transitioning to a PPC. I am a private pilot who now flies a legal ultralight PPC. My training was one hour of ground instruction reviewing regulations, ultralight airspace restrictions and handling then one hour of flight training in a two place machine. At that point I had no trouble taking off and landing in a 300ft x 300ft field with beans on three sides and trees on the fourth. I didn't get my machine going until the next year (that's another story) so I took one more hour from the same instructor and have been flying for the last 3+ years and having a great time. PPC's are rather weather limited by wind but they are also very inexpensive to own and fly, unless you keep upgrading with new wings, radios, lights etc. like me.!

Oh, and I don't get any "swinging" feeling when flying. In fact when there is turbulence they feel more like a sailboat riding the swells than a fixed wing airplane where you can get hard jolts from turbulence.

Good Luck,

Tom
SSPX0060.jpg



Tom Henry
AirVenture Volunteer
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#7 Posted: 9/8/2010 21:09:44

By the way my "avatar" is my wing from last year. The photo I attached is at the end of my second test flight with a new wing this year.