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High Performance Endorsement

Posted By:
Bradford Griswold
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
1
#1 Posted: 11/29/2010 17:19:00

Greetings All,

Quick question for all you CFIs out there. On average, about how long does it take (hours in the air and hours on the ground) to get a high performance endorsement?

Just to give a bit of background information, I passed my private pilot checkride just this past Sunday and as people say, it's a license to learn and there's no time like the present to start!  All my time is in a C172N (about 50 hours) and if I were to get my high performance endorsement, it would more than likely be in a C182.

I've got enough saved to either go for my high perfomance endorsement or to do a full course on the G1000 glass cockpit. Given that I'm already a nerd and have spent several hours playing around with a G1000 sim (either from Garmin or in MS Flight Simulator) it seems that the high performance endorsement would be more beneficial but I welcome all opinions and suggestions.

 



Bill Greenwood
Warbirds of America MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
121
Posts
24
#2 Posted: 12/1/2010 23:46:39

Try to find something that is actually high performance, more so than a 182, and something different than the 172. Look for low wing, retract, etc., maybe a T-34, T-6, Lancair, or at least a Mooney or Bonanza. Good luck.

This will be flying, not just watching a fancy tv/computer.



John Roberts
4
Posts
0
#3 Posted: 12/2/2010 20:07:40

A C-182 is by definition a "high performance" aircraft. The principals to be learned and then practiced concern power management and speed. It's not a difficult transition and could take as little as 2 hours or as much as 5 hours. Before flying read up on manifold pressure and prop governors and have a good understanding of each. Some people have problems dealing with the increased speed of a high performance aircraft but a little practice will solve that.

Go for it!



Elaine Kauh
IAC Member
4
Posts
0
#4 Posted: 12/3/2010 18:14:54

Congratulations on the Private Pilot Certificate!  It's definitely a 'license to learn.' In fact, you will forever be learning as a pilot, no matter how many hours you fly. Enjoy the journey.

The time required for the high-performance endorsement depends on the aircraft. If you're transitioning from a 172 to a similarly equipped 182 (similar panel, for instance, and no G1000) it will likely fall in the 3-5 hour range. And, as the previous poster indicated, if you familiarize yourself with the high-performance systems and study the 182 POH in advance, you'll be well prepared. One tip on 182: make sure you're ready for the nose-heaviness, especially on landings. There's a lot more weight in front of the firewall, compared to the 172. Use enough trim and treat your landings like soft-field landings. Overall, the Cessna 182 is a great airplane! Also, keep in mind that other high-performance aircraft will still require model-specific training after you get the endorsement.

As far as glass cockpit training, this would be more useful if you plan to own or rent a specific airplane, like a new 182 with G1000. Every glass system is different and requires a specific training program.

Good luck with your flying.

 Elaine Kauh, CFI



TDFE
Bradford Griswold
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
1
#5 Posted: 12/22/2010 10:42:15

Thanks to all for your information and replies. Just to provide a bit of follow-up, I was able to get my high performance endorsement while I was out on vacation in Hawaii. I racked up about 7 hours of high performance time in a 182 while flying out there which was a blast (BTW - if anyone is ever out on the Big Island, I highly recommend Tropicbird Flight Service). 



Doug McFall
Homebuilder or Craftsman
4
Posts
1
#6 Posted: 1/9/2011 20:51:05

From my past experience, here is what I have found. Plan on 2 hours of one on one ground instruction if you have little familurization with said aircraft. Remeber, we are talking about a fixed gear aircraft, and this time would cover only aircraft systems. In other words, it does not include training with the G1000 or other special non-standard equipment such as digital fuel flow or special engine monitoring equipment, radar, storm scope... (you get the idea).    Now, if you pursue an on line course, CD, DVD or a study guide including brushing up on the POH, then we might cut down the ground time to one hour give or take. Flight time will take from 2 hours to 10 hours, mostly depending on what you have been flying. If you learned in a 172, and you are flying a 182, it will not take as long as it would to train and provide your high performance check out in a Cherokee Pathfinder 235. I am sure you understand what I am saying here, it is a no brainer. Best advice, just like when you were taking your primary flight training, be prepared before you arrive to meet you CFI. Most important thing to remember is you will be flying higher horse power and most likely at a greater speed, so you will need to be ahead of the aircraft, more so than your smaller 2 or 4 place aircraft. Do not allow yourself to get behind the aircraft, fly a mile or two ahead, (or 5 to 10 miles out when your inbound to land), to avoid a crash or other emergency. Also get comfortable with the aircraft before you decide on taking a night flight. Next mountain to climb, complexe check out. Good luck.

Doug

Idaho CFI



Doug McFall