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Flight Review for Private Pilot by Sport Pilot CFI

Posted By:
Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#1 Posted: 4/20/2011 19:47:12

I understand that a pilot can take a flight review in any aircraft he or she is qualified to fly, so can a sport pilot CFI give a flight review for a private pilot as long as it's done in something that qualifies as a light sport plane?



Chris St Germain
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerAirVenture Volunteer
12
Posts
2
#2 Posted: 4/22/2011 00:21:02 Modified: 4/22/2011 00:31:36

I've been looking into earning the CFI-SP. I was ready to give an opinion, then decided to read Part 61, yet again. I thought a CFI-SP could only give instruction in an airplane to a Sport Pilot, not to a Private. In other words, if someone wants to earn a Private with airplane rating, they would have to be taught by a CFI, not a CFI-SP. When a Private is mentioned, it's in conjunction with a powered parachute or weight-shift. After reading Part 61 again, it seems vague to me, actually.

 

This makes it seem that you can NOT give a flight review to a Private::

§61.413  What are the privileges of my flight instructor certificate
with a sport pilot rating?
If you hold a fight flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot
rating, you are authorized, within the limits of your certificate and rating, to
provide training and logbook endorsements for––
(a)  A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate;
(b)  A sport pilot certificate;
(c)  A flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating;
(d)  A powered parachute or weight-shift-control aircraft rating;
(e)  Sport pilot privileges;
(f)  A flight review or operating privilege for a sport pilot;
(g) .......

***************************************************************

This makes it seem that you CAN give a flight review to a Private.

 §61.415  What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you are subject to the following limits:  proposed flight under the existing conditions and within any limitations listed in the logbook that you consider necessary for the safety of the flight.

(d)  You may not endorse a: 

 (4)  Logbook of a pilot for a flight review, unless you have conducted a review of that pilot in accordance with the requirements of §61.56.

 

So, it looks like an indefinite maybe to me. I'd like to see a solid answer here from someone.

This is slightly related to the current controversy regarding training received for a Sport Pilot cert. If that training is given by a CFI-SP, it doesn't count toward a Private if a pilot wants to upgrade later. Dual received from a CFI during Sport Pilot training would be able to be counted toward a Private cert later. EAA and others are arguing that even training from a CFI-SP should count toward a higher certificate.


 

 



Eric Witherspoon
Homebuilder or Craftsman
29
Posts
3
#3 Posted: 4/22/2011 10:07:49

A local SP CFI that I did a BFR with put it this way - he could do my BFR, but it would only be for SP privileges.  He's an extremely experienced CFI - did thousands of hours in "fat ultralights", went through the ELSA / SP CFI process, then when the ELSA's AW's expried, fought with the FAA for a while for an extension (never given), and this forced him out of business until he could work a deal to buy a new-production SLSA that he's back in business with now.

Anyway, his endorsement in my logbook for SP privileges was all I needed, as I was w/o medical at the time.  After I got the medical back, I did my next BFR with a non-SP CFI (regular CFI? plain-old CFI? - not sure how to state it).

One thing about CFI endorsements - there are standardized wordings, but you can add any clarifications or limitations that you think are necessary.  So until we get a more official-sounding opinion, I would put "limited to Sport Pilot privileges" or wording to that effect on your BFR endorsements of Private pilots.  I think this sort of endorsement fits well within what the SP-CFI is allowed to do - this way, you're not endorsing / signing for privileges you aren't authorized to instruct.



Ray Boyles
Homebuilder or Craftsman
8
Posts
2
#4 Posted: 4/22/2011 13:11:13

Eric,

I am a SP-CFI also, and I agree that your SP-CFI friend is protecting him and you with the way he worded your BFR endorsement.   However, I read the regulations a little differently (isn't it wonderful that the FAA writes the regs so confusing that we can make our own interpretations:-)   For example, consider the case of an ATP rated pilot who is qualified in a Light Sport Aircraft.   According to the Regs, he can take his BFR in any aircraft for which he is qualified (even an LSA) and later go fly a jet with his new BFR in hand.   When an ATP-rated pilot is flying a LSA, in Sport Pilot conditions, he is exercising his Sport Pilot privileges, correct?   Therefore, an SP-CFI can give that ATP person a BFR in a light sport aircraft without imposing any conditions on the ATP about what aircraft he can fly after his BFR, correct?.    Otherwise, how can a "regular" CFI rated only for ASEL give a BFR to a AMEL-rated pilot in a ASEL without forcing that AMEL pilot to fly only ASEL in the future????

Comments?

BTW:  I agree with EAA NAFI and AOPA that SP-CFI instruction should count as dual towards any pilot certificate.   Also, SP-CFIs should be able to give BFRs, tailwheel endorsements, etc to holders of any pilot certificates, as long as it is done in LSAs.   SP-CFIs have mostly the same CFI training and pass the same CFI tests as "regular" CFIs; why treat them as something less just because they never took the Commercial checkride?

Ray Boyles




Ray W. Boyles
Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#5 Posted: 4/27/2011 19:33:08

I agree with Ray.  I have a CFI-Glider and I can give a BFR to an ATP who also holds a glider rating without stating in the logbook that he can only exercise glider privileges.  Once I add on my CFI-SP ASEL, I'll check with the local FSDO just to be sure. 



Helen Woods
29
Posts
2
#6 Posted: 4/30/2011 20:23:44
A CFI-S can perform a flight review for any pilot, regardless of certificate level held, so long as it is completed in a light sport eligible aircraft for which the pilot is rated.  I checked this one with 610 a while back.

 

Helen



Bob Meder
NAFI MemberAirVenture Volunteer
223
Posts
87
#7 Posted: 5/1/2011 13:42:48

Helen's right.  Also, as for "limiting" a flight review (FWIW, there is no such thing as a "BFR" - you can get a flight review every day of the year if you want to), it doesn't happen.  A flight review is a flight review, and the instructor's endorsement covers everything.  That came up in humorous fashion in the St. Louis area when some balloon pilots, who only need a commercial certificate to instruct, found out that, by giving someone a flight review in a hot air balloon, they were covering everying else the pilot had.  When they asked the FSDO about a situation where the person involved had a type rating in a jet, the FSDO said, "Well you might want to include some good questions about that type of lfying." 



Bob Meder "Anxiety is nature's way of telling you that you already goofed up."
Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#8 Posted: 5/1/2011 16:07:03

It may not be called a "BFR" anymore, but for us old timers, it will always be a BFR.