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Sport Pilot and aerobatics

Posted By:
Paul Stuart
62
Posts
38
#1 Posted: 5/29/2009 23:22:16

Are there any restrictions on flying aerobatics if I have the Sport Pilot certificate?  I think the answer is "no" but want to be sure that I'm not missing anything that I should be taking into consideration.  Thanks for any help you can give.



Joe Norris
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
328
Posts
137
#2 Posted: 6/1/2009 11:23:45

Hello Paul,

There is nothing in the regulations that would prohibit a sport pilot from performing aerobatics.  Obviously the aircraft would have to be capable of and not prohibited from aerobatics and would also need to meet the definition of a light-sport aircraft.

Cheers!

Joe



Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate
Paul Stuart
62
Posts
38
#3 Posted: 6/1/2009 12:03:04

Thanks Joe!  Apart from the Sonex, do you know of any other other light-sport aircraft that are "approved" for aerobatics?



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#4 Posted: 6/2/2009 10:37:48 Modified: 6/2/2009 10:43:03

A clipped wing J-3 Cub certainly qualifies - I have a half share in one.

I used to have a Citabria and although the clipped Cub has less power (90hp vs 150hp), it's light and agile, and seems better at aerobatics in every respect. 

Clipped Cubs are one of the best kept secrets in aviation... the classic J-3 Cub spirit & feel, sportier performance but still dead easy to fly.   I'm surprised one of the "new" Cub manufacturers hasn't come up with a clipped model yet.

 



Joe Norris
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
328
Posts
137
#5 Posted: 6/2/2009 11:03:37

Paul,

I am not aware of any of the factory-built SLSA that are approved for aerobatics.  Adam Smith's post on the Clipped Wing Cub does a good job of explaining that option.  Also, there are probably a number of homebuilts in addition to the Sonex that would allow aerobatics and still fit within the LSA definition.

Cheers!

Joe



Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate
Rand Siegfried
IAC MemberVintage Aircraft Association MemberWarbirds of America MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
18
Posts
11
#6 Posted: 6/4/2009 19:18:40

My daughter has a homebuilt Cub, which would have qualified for Light Sport, that I did very light aerobatics in during the flight testing phase- so technically it is aerobatic, but being a long wing Cub it is not the most pleasant aircraft to go up in and twist around.  I too think the manufacturers should build a clipped wing version- I agree with Adam- a great airplane.

Our Cub is perfect for flying low and slow though!



Rand Fly Low and Slow
Joe Norris
Vintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
328
Posts
137
#7 Posted: 6/5/2009 10:00:06

I agree 100% Rand!  You just can't beat a Cub for good old "low and slow" fun flying.  it doesn't get any better than that!

Cheers!

Joe



Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate
Jon McDonald
Homebuilder or Craftsman
25
Posts
12
#8 Posted: 6/14/2009 00:53:55

In addition to the sonex/waiex/xenos line  I know of a few other kits that are aerobatic, which also qualify as LSAs.  The two that come to mind first are the RansS-9 and the Rans S-10.  Also, some of the older single place biplanes like the Acrosport 1 seem to qualify.



Jon McDonald Building Sonex #1287
Lynne Reinhardt
IAC Member
1
Post
0
#9 Posted: 7/23/2009 09:44:16

Clipped Wing Taylorcraft and (as noted) the Clipped Wing Cub. Both are LSA unless you put too big of an engine in 'em.

 

Lynne



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#10 Posted: 7/26/2009 09:28:38

The first plane on the first row of parking in the new IAC parking area at OSH is Arlee Titel's Clipped Wing Cub.  (orange and blue starburst).    He has a For Sale sign on it.   Hurry down there... Clipped Wing Cubs rarely last long on the market, and this is a NICE one!



Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#11 Posted: 8/10/2009 23:18:41

Swick Clip -T had a booth at Oshkosh this year, looks like it's LSA compliant and fully aerobatic, plans and kits available.  http://www.swickt.com/ 



Tom DeWinter
Vintage Aircraft Association Member
21
Posts
7
#12 Posted: 8/18/2009 13:26:35

The Hatz Bantam MAY be aerobatic.  I think the designer is currently completing a stress analysis done to determine positive and negative G-loadings for the design.  The original Hatz CB-1 from which the Bantam originated from is aerobatic but it is not really LSA.  Unless you wanted to make it into an essentially single seater by limiting the gross weight to 1,320 lbs.

The Baby great lakes is also aerobatic and I'm sure LSA eligible but only single place.



Rick Caldwell
IAC MemberHomebuilder or Craftsman
6
Posts
0
#13 Posted: 10/4/2009 17:44:02

There is a new light sport plane from Germany that is designed for Sportsman competition. I forget the name but it was in Sport Aviation article on light sport a few months ago. They have videos on their website. It is composite and has a low wing with an elliptical planform like a Spitfire. It looks real nice. It's available as a kit.

 



John Warren
Homebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
2
#14 Posted: 10/11/2009 18:26:44

Looks like there aren't too many LSA aerobatic options. 

What would you think of a Pitts replica that was LSA with a 80-95hp four stroke?

Plans built, materials, full kits? 

I think aerobatics in LSAs would be fun and a good reflection of pilot skill and practice. 

For years I have enjoyed the "crazy cub" and "flying farmer" acts at least as much as the bigger noisier acts.

Thoughts?



Erik Edgren
Vintage Aircraft Association Member
1
Post
0
#15 Posted: 10/15/2009 21:02:10

I would think that both the Rose Parakeet and Skyote would qualify as LSA's. I've never had the privelage to fly either but both are supposed to be great little acro mounts.... Otherwise, as a Clip T owner, I'd have to put my vote in for the Clip T.



George Grissom
IAC Member
3
Posts
2
#16 Posted: 10/25/2009 17:39:25

Lynne, you are right on keep them light and they are a snappy performer, my swick t has the 0-200 pumped up to about 130 hp. thanks to performance engines,. with the near symmetrical airfoil and an inverted oil system you can compete in intermediate  with the pumped up engine. glad to see a LSA aerobatic forum .  George Grissom Swick clipt , LLC.



George Grissom
IAC Member
3
Posts
2
#17 Posted: 12/4/2009 17:53:19

Adam, thanks for the mention of my Swick-T  exhibit at air adventure 2009, The first quick build kit has been sold to a gentelman in Lake land florida and he has completed the wing kit already, we are finishing the fuselage now and will have new quick buid photos out soon and on my web site, also something never seen before on the web site it will be interesting to view.. Lsa is where it is at and will be for a long time, the Swick -t is a great performer with any engine you put in it. Mike Swick and Jim Swick always said keep it light and you have one snappy performer.I have weight and balance with a 150 hp. in the Swick-T and it weighed in at 1280 lbs. of course it was basic in side the cockpit ,but it can be done.  All the best, George Grissom ,Swick-T



Bob Beausoleil
20
Posts
1
#18 Posted: 1/1/2010 14:18:19

I've become interested in the Meyers Little Toot for flying aerobatics under the Light Sport rule if the stall speed can be verified.  There have been a few magazine articles over the years showing stall speeds anywhere from 50 to 65 mph.  There are a few posts on biplaneforum.com saying it is actually more like 47 mph.  It looks like it would be an awesome light sport acro plane.



Tom Hackel
Homebuilder or Craftsman
126
Posts
22
#19 Posted: 1/12/2010 22:44:16

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=5a1fee895ca018ffc6800ff90277a17a&rgn=div8&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.3.10.4.7.2&idno=14 

 

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=5a1fee895ca018ffc6800ff90277a17a&rgn=div8&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.3.10.4.7.10&idno=14

 

I've read threw it before, this is all I could find that applied. Stay well off the beaten path and you should be fine. If your close enough that some one whants to know your name for your cool stunts...... I hate answering questions.



Walter Schaefer
IAC Member
1
Post
0
#20 Posted: 2/11/2010 21:39:26

Flying some light acro in a Starduster SA900 AKA V-Star (LSA legal even with 0-320).  Great plane in vertical, roll rate is a bit slow (approx 90 degree/sec) so all rolls are slow rolls.  It is very forgiving and pleasant to fly.  I have only lost it once and the resultant spin was straight forward and corrected instantly once recognized.  Good, no EXCELENT  visability for a biplane.  I hear..Tailslides are not reccomended unless belcranks are modified...  Otherwise a very tough airplane.



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