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Video: 2010 Sportsman Known Flown in a Super Decathlon - In-Cockpit Vidoe

Posted By:
Wayne Bressler
Homebuilder or Craftsman
89
Posts
30
#1 Posted: 1/19/2010 20:06:52

One of our "local" guys here in the DC Metro area.  Adam Cope flys the 2010 Sportsman Known in a Super Decathlon.

 



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Adam Smith
Young Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
538
Posts
381
#2 Posted: 1/20/2010 00:15:27

I really enjoyed watching that, thanks for posting!



Sam Shifrin
IAC Member
9
Posts
5
#3 Posted: 1/20/2010 08:46:01

As a new aerobatic pilot and owner of a Super Decathlon, this video is just what was needed.  Although I am recieveing aerobatic instruction from a first rate school (Executive Flyers), I have searched Youtube a "million" times looking for a "clean" video of the beginning levels of IAC competition.  This video is exceptionally well done with captions, and the two important views, and done in a Decathlon (which most beginners are using). 

It would be great if the IAC or someone else would do a similar video for each level of competition (knowns), but for newcommers like me,  as simple as it may seem to others, a video like this of the Primary Known would be a great help.

A series like this should be part of the IAC web site!

Thanks for putting this one up,

Sam



Wayne Bressler
Homebuilder or Craftsman
89
Posts
30
#4 Posted: 1/20/2010 15:32:00

Adam Cope does aerobatic instruction, as well.  Here's his website: www.dcaerobatics.com

He also has recent videos of flying the Super Decathlon through the 2010 Primary and Intermediate Knowns on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/user/naspin

I'm glad you guys are enjoying the videos.



Tricycles are for babies. Taildraggers, Inc. www.taildraggersinc.com
Sam Shifrin
IAC Member
9
Posts
5
#5 Posted: 1/22/2010 07:47:29

Thanks for the link to Adam Cope's web site.  His video of flying the primary in a Super Decathlon is really excellent and helpful.  He has other good information for beginners on his site as well.  I still think the IAC should have similar videos on their site - or work with Adam Cope to have a link to his.

In a prior post I asked about "how" to really do a slow roll in a Decathlon and didn't get much response.  Adam Cope demonstrates a nice slow roll in his "primary" video.  Looks to me like he uses a lot of "top rudder" on entry to the roll, getting the nose well above the horizon without needing to pull up prior to entry.  I'll be trying that next session. 

Thanks again.



Tony Johnstone
IAC MemberNAFI Member
61
Posts
15
#6 Posted: 1/22/2010 12:59:45

Sam-  Went back and looked at you earlier post about slow-rolling the Decathlon.  I teach acro in a Super D and would agree it is probably the hardest maneuver to learn initially.  I have found the best way to get it across is to have the student get comfortable with inverted level flight to see the attitude necessary.  Now, look at the upright level attitude, and think about getting from one to the other, then back upright.  It is not necessary to raise the nose prior to starting the roll, but the nose does have to be rising throughout the first half, then coming back down through the second half.

 

   Start the roll from level with simultaneous application of back stick and aileron into the roll, also a little dab of rudder into the roll to compensate for the adverse yaw.  As the roll progresses, through the first 1/4 the stick will be coming forward to approximatly neutral at the knife-edge, while adding increasing amounts of top rudder to keep the nose rising.  As you pass through knife-edge towards inverted, keep the stick coming forward to keep the nose coming up while easing off the top rudder to neutral at the top. As you start the second half back to upright, the stick needs to be coming back throughout, while adding top rudder to a maximum at knife-edge, then easing off as you come back to level.  The roll rate should be constant, so keep the aileron deflection constant throughout the roll as the airspeed will be constant also.

 

  The biggest problem I see is not getting the nose high enough through the first half, this leads to "dishing" out of the second half, usually kind of wallowing off in the direction of roll and losing a bunch of altitude.  Alternatively, we get to near inverted, realize the nose is too low and then give a mighty heave of forward stick which causes us to get shot out against the belts!!

 

   So, start level, you don't need to pull the nose up before starting the roll, but it should be rising through the first half and falling through the second.  Find the spot on the horizon that seems to stay put and try to roll the airplane around it. 

 

                                                                Have fun,  Tony Johnstone, MCFI-A



Sam Shifrin
IAC Member
9
Posts
5
#7 Posted: 1/22/2010 18:51:45

Hi Tony,

Thank you very much, that's exactly the kind of response and infromation I was looking for in my initial post.  I'm clearly not getting the nose high enough early enough when I try to roll form flat and level.   I understand the "top rudder" both sides of the roll, but havn't tried using some back stick at the initiation.  LIke you noted with others, I usually end up pushing out pretty hard when inverted to get the nose "up". Tomorrows weather forcast sounds like a great flying day here in CT, so I'll be out there trying again, but this time with a little pull as I roll in.

Thank you very much,

Sam