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Aerobatic Aircraft Selection

Posted By:
Jason Kater
IAC MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 12/21/2010 15:44:01

Hello All,

I am looking to buy an aerobatic aircraft in the spring, as I plan on seriously competing in aerobatics.  I am looking for some suggestions and advice on what aircraft would get me the most aerobatic bang for the buck as my budget is limited.  My budget is limited to around $60,000 and I would like to purchase an aircraft that can be competitive for as many competition categories as possible (ie. primary - unlimited).

I was thinking either a Laser 200 or Yak 55....any suggestions out there?


Thanks for the help!


Jason



#2 Posted: 12/21/2010 21:11:56 Modified: 12/21/2010 21:14:02

Jason...I am bias towards a Pitts...I own one, a S2B that it is for sale but at $85K firm.....You can compete from Primary up to Advanced in it...Ask Rob Bond.  ...forget about unlimited!

If I had to start all over again and $60K was my budget I will buy me another Pitts...the laser 200 and the Yak 55 are nice aircraft, however the yak 55 is expensive to own and you have to adhere to the experimental Exhibition category certification....(a Pain in the A....) if you ask me.. (lots of it involved including reporting to the FAA every year) as for the laser...I have no experience. 

Unless you are super talented the Pitts S1S, S2A, S2B will be more than enogugh for many years to come. If you want to go experimental, go with a Christen Eagle. all the aircraft are within your budget except the S2B

If a monoplane is a must at tha price, i will go with the One Design DR107. Donny E Bond in NC has a few for sale in Barnstormers.

Learn to fly in one of this acro rides and move accordingly. 

 

Have fun in your   journey and please dont become another statistic.  Fly safe with at least 1,500 feet below you at all times..

Remember...you need to crawl before you learn to walk, you have to walk before you can run...Easy steps! and hire an aerobatic instructor! Do Spin and Emergency recovery procedures training too!

 

 

 

 



N202MK Giles 202 S/N 11 Owner
Wes Liu
5
Posts
1
#3 Posted: 12/23/2010 17:12:32

 

Hello Jason,

 

Your post does not offer any info about your previous flying experience.  That will be important to the airplane that you choose.   If you have little or no tailwheel airplane experience, then your best option might be to rent a Decathlon at a school and build time and experience.  Pitts are more challenging to take-off and land than to fly in the box.  And the insurance rates for less experienced pilots reflect that.

 

I will also note that if you can find a similarly inclined pilot as a partner, your combined airplane budget will cover a wider range of airplane choices.  Aerobatic airplanes sit a lot, and sharing makes the economics work better.

 

Best of luck

 

Wes

Pitts S-2A



Elaine Kauh
IAC Member
4
Posts
0
#4 Posted: 12/28/2010 14:53:28

Hi, Jason:

I agree with Wes -- if you are just starting out in aerobatics and/or are new to tailwheels, start with renting a Decathlon, or perhaps buying one to get instruction in. There are previous threads on this forum discussing which model of Decathlon is best for your mission. The Decathlon is fun, economical, and is great for learning aerobatic basics (Patty Wagstaff and many others started out in one). You really have to know what you're doing to make the maneuvers look good in this airplane. When you are ready to compete past Sportsman, then look at trading up.

Elaine Kauh

CFI



TDFE
Chuck Benham
IAC MemberNAFI Member
1
Post
0
#5 Posted: 1/20/2011 18:03:23

Jason,

I bought a Yak 55M 3 years ago and flew my first contest in sportsman 4 months later. I am now flying intermediate. It  has been a wonderful plane. Very honest with no bad habits that i have found. Insurance is $1500/year and owner assisted conditional inspections around $800/year. Plan on 30 gallons per hour for acro (most my flights are 20 to 30 minutes) and 20 gal/hour getting to the contest. I fax a list of the contest I plan on flying in to FSDO at the beginning of the year. The biggest problem I have had is with the air start system with holding air but that has not been a problem lately. Easy to fly and landing is a non event and as they say "Strong like bull". I would be glad to discuss my thoughts on owning and operating the Yak feel free to email me.


Charles

CD610201@aol.com



Jason Kater
IAC MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
3
Posts
0
#6 Posted: 1/20/2011 20:15:55

Thanks alot for all the suggestions!!

 

I am definitely considering the Yak-55 as it seems to be the best bang for the buck and I have significant high performance experience. 

From what I have researched it seems that it's drag created during acro is probably its biggest weakness, primarily considering ulimited sequences.... obviously I am definitely not there.

 

Charles, I will keep your email incase i have some questions. 

 

Happy Landings

 

Jason



Christopher Huey
IAC Member
1
Post
0
#7 Posted: 1/21/2011 01:26:14

I have owned and flown both Pitts and Laser and have a hour or so in a Yak55. The Yak was a lot of fun, I am not a huge fan of the "feel" of the rudder but with some time I would have got used to it. The Yak55 is a good choice.



Ashley Messenger
Young Eagles Pilot or Volunteer
1
Post
0
#8 Posted: 1/25/2011 08:55:20

I'm going to put in a shameless plug for the Christen Eagle. For about 60k, you can get an immaculate airplane. It is very competitive through Intermediate, and has been known to place in wood territory in Advanced. Very easy airplane to land, good visibility, foolproof canopy, and a lot of utility as it is a good cross-country airplane. I get 160mph true at 8500 feet on 9 to 10gph, it burns right around 13 at acro power. The cockpit is roomy and will accommodate a wide range of pilot sizes by varying the seat cushion/parachute arrangement. All in all, a good blend of acro capability and general utility. 



Chip Woods
Warbirds of America Member
1
Post
0
#9 Posted: 4/4/2011 16:56:29

Well I'll have to say I am a little bias here, I own a Yak55M. It is a great airplane,but does need a little more care and feeding that a flat motor airplane.

 

We.ve had both a Pitts and the Yak and would prefer the Yak hands down. I think it is much more bang for the buck.

 

I hate that it has come to this, but it is time for it to go and it is for sale. It is listed on Barnstormers and would very much like to talk to you about it and what it takes to operate it.

 

Chip