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Options for N-Numbering 2 Place Ultralights

Posted By:
Darin Danelski
Homebuilder or Craftsman
2
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 9/10/2010 09:54:11

I recently obtained a 2-Place Quicksilver that was picked up from a Widow.  Her husband never N-Numbered it and I want to know what my options are to register this aircraft. I have been told it is impossible, but have also been told there are N-Numbers available from salvaged aircraft that can be "purchased". 

Technically, If I just completed "building" a 2 seat UL, couldn't I still register it?  So If I took it apart and rebuilt it, does that count?

 

Any input as to my options would be appreciated.  I am a certificated Private Pilot.

 

 

Thanks!

 

 



Timm Bogenhagen
Homebuilder or CraftsmanUltralight Enthusiast
30
Posts
13
#2 Posted: 9/10/2010 15:53:03 Modified: 9/10/2010 15:56:20

Rebuilding the aircraft does not qualify it for amateur built.  If the plane was amateur built, and you can get the builders records to prove the majority portion (at least 51%) of the original fabrication and assembly was completed by amateurs for their own education or recreation you can certificate it in the experimental amateur built category.  The builders records typically consist of any or all of the following:  builder log; construction photos; plans; receipts for purchases; notarized affidavit from the builder; kit bill of sale.  The more documentation you can get the better, to prove that it qualifies for an amateur built airworthiness certificate.  If you cannot obtain the builders records then there would be no way to prove it was amateur built and would not qualify for this type of airworthiness certificate. 

 

EAA sells a amateur built certification kit to help walk you thru the paperwork process of registering and certificating an amateur built aircraft.  It is available online at this link, http://shop.eaa.org/html/homebuilders.html?cart_id=

 

If you cannot meet the amateur built requirements (the "51% rule") you will need to certificate the aircraft in the experimental exhibition category.  The prime limitation of this category requires owners of exhibition aircraft to submit a program letter at the beginning of each year to the local FAA flight standards district office identifying each airport they intend to fly to and exhibit the aircraft.  Additionally, the aircraft can be flown to maintain the pilot proficiency but the FAA limits the proficiency flight takeoffs and landings to the home based airport.



Jim Heffelfinger
Homebuilder or Craftsman
256
Posts
43
#4 Posted: 9/10/2010 20:09:45

Getting the FSDO to buy into the Quicksilver qualifying in intent as an exhibition aircraft might be a challenge.  



Darin Danelski
Homebuilder or Craftsman
2
Posts
0
#5 Posted: 9/11/2010 07:16:30

Thanks for the input guys.  What I don't understand is, what If I built a "new" 2 place Quicksilver and wanted to N-Number it.  Why is that impossible  Doesn't it qualify as an experimental or light sport?  Why then couldn't I N-number any aircraft I build.  I don't understand the reasoning.   How dos the FAA expect UL pilots to get trained if there are no similar aircraft available to train in?  If they don't allow n-numbering of new 2-seaters, eventually the supply of trainers will dwindle to nothing, and we'll have UL pilots taking to the air without training.

 

Has anyone heard of the possibility of buying N-Numbers from salvaged aircraft.  I had heard they ae available on the market?  Buying the N-Number from a crashed plane of similar manufacture.

 

 



Timm Bogenhagen
Homebuilder or CraftsmanUltralight Enthusiast
30
Posts
13
#6 Posted: 9/13/2010 08:51:55

Darin,

If you buy a new Quicksilver 2-place kit you can build it as an amateur and then register and certificate it in the experimental amateur built category.  Nothing new here, this has been allowed for many, many years.

Timm