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Hangars - steel quonset or cement block walls in Florida

Posted By:
Ronald Dailey
Homebuilder or Craftsman
4
Posts
0
#1 Posted: 10/25/2010 20:45:38

Hello:

I'm thinking about buying a lot with a house and a hangar on a small airstrip in Florida.  One lot has a 40 by 60 steel quonset hangar and others have a 50 by 50 or a 45 by 45 cement block hangar.  Given that I'm in Florida, I'm concerned about heat in the hangar -- possibly way too much of it in the steel quonset hangar.  Does anybody have experiences with both styles? Should I absolutely stay away from the uninsulated steel quonset hangar or is it likely to be no more uncomfortable in the hot Florida summer than the cement block walls hangars?

 

Thanks,



Richard Warner
Homebuilder or CraftsmanAirVenture Volunteer
32
Posts
2
#2 Posted: 10/28/2010 18:51:21

Why not insulate the steel one and put a couple of roof vents on it..  I have a steel one here in southeast Louisiana that is insulated, and while it gets warm in it, I don't think any warmer than a concrete block one would after the sun soaked the blocks and heated up the roof.  Another thing to think about is hurricanes.  Unless the concrete blocks are tied together with steel, I think the metal one would do better in a storm.  Along the Florida Panhandle, several years ago, a hurricane hit and the buildings made out of blocks or bricks, didn't do well at all as the constant wind buffeting broke the mortar joints, while wood and steel buildings made it through much better.  Just my opinion though.  I'm not a structural engineer.

Richard



Ronald Dailey
Homebuilder or Craftsman
4
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0
#3 Posted: 10/29/2010 09:10:17

Hello Richard,

Thank you for your kind advice.  I will certainly take it account as I make my decision.

Ron

 



Larry Lyons
IAC MemberVintage Aircraft Association MemberYoung Eagles Pilot or VolunteerHomebuilder or Craftsman
14
Posts
7
#4 Posted: 10/29/2010 11:21:52

Another thought is the bricks will hold heat for hours.  I lived in a brick home here in the mid-west and once the bricks got hot the house was stifling for hours.  As a matter of fact the house got warmest about sun down and stayed that way through bed time.  So cooler longer in the morning then a steel hanger but hotter longer after mid-day. Larry



Joel Mayhall
4
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0
#5 Posted: 10/29/2010 15:04:27

My first concern would be the structural integrity of the buildings.  Hiring  structural engineer to evaluate both buildings might be an option.  Insulating the structure would be something to consider if needed.